Tuesday September 17, 2019

Taking Hot Yoga Classes Lowers Blood Pressure of Adults with Elevated or Stage 1 Hypertension

"The results of our study start the conversation that hot yoga could be feasible and effective in terms of reducing blood pressure without medication

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Hot Yoga, Classes, Blood Pressure
While there is evidence of regular, room-temperature yoga's positive effect on blood pressure, little is known about hot yoga's potential impact on blood pressure, said researchers who presented the study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that taking hot yoga classes lowered the blood pressure of adults with elevated or stage 1 hypertension.

While there is evidence of regular, room-temperature yoga’s positive effect on blood pressure, little is known about hot yoga’s potential impact on blood pressure, said researchers who presented the study at Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions in the US.

“The results of our study start the conversation that hot yoga could be feasible and effective in terms of reducing blood pressure without medication,” said study author Stacy Hunter, Assistant Professor at Texas State University.

Hot yoga is a modern practice, typically offered in a hot, humid atmosphere, with room temperatures around 105 degrees Fahrenheit.

Hot Yoga, Classes, Blood Pressure
Researchers have found that taking hot yoga classes lowered the blood pressure of adults with elevated or stage 1 hypertension. Pixabay

For the study, the research team recruited 10 men and women, between ages 20-65 years. Participants had either elevated blood pressure (systolic blood pressure between 120 mmHg to 129 mmHg and diastolic pressure less than 80 mmHg) or stage 1 hypertension (130 mmHg to 139 mmHg systolic and 80 mmHg to 89 mmHg diastolic pressure.)

The research team randomly assigned five participants to take 12 weeks of three times-weekly hour-long hot yoga classes and they assigned the other five to a control group of no yoga classes.

They compared the average blood pressures of the two groups after the 12 weeks.

The researchers looked at average 24-hour blood pressure readings, as well as perceived stress and vascular function of participants in both groups.

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They found systolic blood pressure dropped from an average 126 mmHg at the study’s start to 121 mmHg after 12 weeks of hot yoga.

Average diastolic pressure also decreased from 82 mmHg to 79 mmHg in the hot yoga group.

According to the study, average blood pressure did not change among the five adults in the control group, those who did not take hot yoga classes.

Perceived stress levels fell among those in the hot yoga group but not in the non-yoga group, the research said. (IANS)

Next Story

Rate of Blood Pressure among Pregnant Women Aged 35 and Over in US Increases by More than 75%

Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s - and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result

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Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased by more than 75 per cent since 1970, according to a new research.

In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010.

“Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s – and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result,” said the study led by author and Indian origin researcher Cande V. Ananth from Rutgers University.

According to the researchers, advanced maternal age was associated with the increase, with the rate of chronic hypertension increasing on an average by six per cent per year, 13 times what it was in 1970.

Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased. Pixabay

Prior research has shown that compared with white women, black women have higher rates of obesity, are more likely to smoke and use drugs and are at greater social disadvantage, all of which may contribute to an increased risk of chronic hypertension.

“The best outcome would be to control hypertension before becoming pregnant by reducing obesity, quitting smoking, adopting an overall healthier lifestyle before and during pregnancy, and treating high blood pressure effectively. For every 1-2 lbs. lost prior to pregnancy, blood pressure is reduced,” Ananth said.

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“Not only do these findings have implications for the health of the women and newborns during pregnancy, they have lasting implications on future risks of cardiovascular and stroke risks in women later in life,” he added. (IANS)