Wednesday January 29, 2020

Taking Hot Yoga Classes Lowers Blood Pressure of Adults with Elevated or Stage 1 Hypertension

"The results of our study start the conversation that hot yoga could be feasible and effective in terms of reducing blood pressure without medication

0
//
Hot Yoga, Classes, Blood Pressure
While there is evidence of regular, room-temperature yoga's positive effect on blood pressure, little is known about hot yoga's potential impact on blood pressure, said researchers who presented the study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that taking hot yoga classes lowered the blood pressure of adults with elevated or stage 1 hypertension.

While there is evidence of regular, room-temperature yoga’s positive effect on blood pressure, little is known about hot yoga’s potential impact on blood pressure, said researchers who presented the study at Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions in the US.

“The results of our study start the conversation that hot yoga could be feasible and effective in terms of reducing blood pressure without medication,” said study author Stacy Hunter, Assistant Professor at Texas State University.

Hot yoga is a modern practice, typically offered in a hot, humid atmosphere, with room temperatures around 105 degrees Fahrenheit.

Hot Yoga, Classes, Blood Pressure
Researchers have found that taking hot yoga classes lowered the blood pressure of adults with elevated or stage 1 hypertension. Pixabay

For the study, the research team recruited 10 men and women, between ages 20-65 years. Participants had either elevated blood pressure (systolic blood pressure between 120 mmHg to 129 mmHg and diastolic pressure less than 80 mmHg) or stage 1 hypertension (130 mmHg to 139 mmHg systolic and 80 mmHg to 89 mmHg diastolic pressure.)

The research team randomly assigned five participants to take 12 weeks of three times-weekly hour-long hot yoga classes and they assigned the other five to a control group of no yoga classes.

They compared the average blood pressures of the two groups after the 12 weeks.

The researchers looked at average 24-hour blood pressure readings, as well as perceived stress and vascular function of participants in both groups.

Also Read- Scotland’s Fabled Loch Ness Monster might Most Likely be Giant Eel

They found systolic blood pressure dropped from an average 126 mmHg at the study’s start to 121 mmHg after 12 weeks of hot yoga.

Average diastolic pressure also decreased from 82 mmHg to 79 mmHg in the hot yoga group.

According to the study, average blood pressure did not change among the five adults in the control group, those who did not take hot yoga classes.

Perceived stress levels fell among those in the hot yoga group but not in the non-yoga group, the research said. (IANS)

Next Story

BP Problems in Youth May Lead to Heart Diseases: Study

BP problems linked to higher heart disease risk in youths

0
Heart
Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of heart disease. Pixabay

Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease by middle age, according to a new health study.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Cardiology, suggests that the current practice of averaging blood pressure readings to determine whether medications are necessary could be masking a potential early warning sign from the fluctuations themselves.

“If a patient comes in with one reading in December and a significantly lower reading in January, the average might be within the range that would appear normal,” said study lead author Yuichiro Yano from Duke University in the US.

“But is that difference associated with health outcomes in later life?” Yano said.

“That’s the question we sought to answer in this study, and it turns out the answer is yes.” Yano added.

Heart BP
A systolic blood pressure reading over 130 is considered hypertensive and has long been a major risk factor for heart diseases. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The researchers arrived at their conclusion after analysing 30 years of data from a large, diverse cohort of young people enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study between March 1985 and June 1986.

Of the 3,394 people studied, about 46 per cent were African American and 56 per cent were women.

The patients had regular blood pressure checks, with patterns evaluated across five visits, including at two, five, seven and 10 years. At the 10-year mark, the average age of the patients was about 35.

The main reading of concern to Yano’s research team was the systolic blood pressure level, the upper number in the equation that measures the pressure in the blood vessels when the heart pumps.

The researchers were able to identify which young people had variations in systolic blood pressure by the age of 35 and then track them over the next 20 years and see whether there appeared to be a correlating increase in cardiovascular disease.

Also Read- India Registers an Uptick in Diabetes and Thyroid: Report

Over those years, study participants reported 181 deaths and 162 cardio-vascular events, which included fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease, hospitalisation for heart failure, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or a stent procedure for blocked arteries.

The researchers found that each 3.6-mm spike in systolic blood pressure during young adulthood was associated with a 15-percent higher risk for heart disease events, independent of the averaged blood pressure levels during young adulthood and any single systolic blood pressure measurement in midlife. (IANS)