Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
While working with a filmmaker, Nawazuddin Siddiqui is not concerned with the gender of the storyteller. Wikimedia Commons

National Award-winning actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui has worked with several talented female filmmakers in his career. Nandita Das called the shots in “Firaaq” and “Manto”, Reema Kagti directed “Talaash” and, recently, Tannishtha Chatterjee wielded the megaphone in the upcoming “Roam Rome Mein”. Siddiqui says as an actor he does not differentiate between talents based on gender.

“When I work with a filmmaker, I am not concerned about the gender of the storyteller. For me, whether it is Nandita or Tannishtha, they are talented storytellers. They came to me with a vision and I am participating in telling their stories on screen. For me, what matters the most is creativity, and I have to be on the same wavelength with the director. Talent should not be celebrated on the basis of gender. So, when Tannishtha was directing me, not for a single moment did I feel that a woman was giving direction. For me, it was a talented human being I was collaborating with,” Nawazuddin told IANS.



Nawazuddin Siddiqui is a strong believer in the fact that art has no language. Wikimedia Commons

Tannishtha’s “Roam Rome Mein” has been in then news lately for the response that the film has been eliciting in the festival circuit. Apart from its India premiere at the Jio MAMI 21st Mumbai Film Festival, the film has travelled to Busan International Film Festival and Rome Film Festival.

Set in Rome, the film features Vineet Kumar, Isha Talwar and Italian actors Urbano Barberini and Pamela Villoresi along with Nawazuddin and Tannishtha.

Nawazuddin says he is happy with the positive response the film received from global audiences, but it is special to be back home.

Also Read- Ayushmann Khurrana: Bollywood’s Unlikely Hit Machine

“There are a few sequences in the film where the humour is very ‘desi’, which one cannot really translate into another language. Here in Mumbai, people are laughing during those scenes and enjoying. We are so happy to see such a response. I am a strong believer in the fact that art has no language but at the end of the day, nothing like sharing our film with our audience,” added the actor. (Bollywood Country)


Popular

Unsplash

Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal.

"In India, to be born as a man is a crime, to question a woman is an atrocious crime, and this all because of those women who keep suppressing men in the name of feminism."

Feminism, a worldwide movement that started to establish, define and defend equal rights for women in all sections- economically, politically, and socially. India, being a patriarchal society gives a gender advantage to the men in the society thus, Indian feminists sought to fight against the culture-specific issue for women in India. Feminism itself is nothing but a simple movement that pursues equal rights for women (including transwomen) and against misogyny both external and internal. It states nowhere that women should get more wages than men, that women deserve more respect than men, that's pseudo-feminism.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Yakshi statue by Kanayi Kunjiraman at Malampuzha garden, Kerala

Kerala is a land of many good things. It has an abundance of nature, culture, art, and food. It is also a place of legend and myth, and is known for its popular folklore, the legend of Yakshi. This is not a popular tale outside the state, but it is common knowledge for travellers, especially those who fare through forests at night.

The legend of the yakshi is believed to be India's equivalent of the Romanian Dracula, except of course, the Yakshi is a female. Many Malayalis believe that the Yakshi wears a white saree and had long hair. She has a particular fragrance, which is believed to be the fragrance of the Indian devil-tree flowers. She seduces travellers with her beauty, and kills them brutally.

Keep Reading Show less
Pinterest

Ancient India not only made mentions of homosexuality but accepted it as well.


The LGBTQ+ acronym stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and others. In India LGBTQ+ community also include a specific social group, part religious cult, and part caste: the Hijras. They are culturally defined either as "neither men nor women" or as men who become women by adopting women's dress and behavior. Section 377 of the India Penal code that criminalized all sexual acts "against the order of nature" i.e. engaging in oral sex or anal sex along with other homosexual activities were against the law, ripping homosexual people off of their basic human rights. Thus, the Indian Supreme Court ruled a portion of Section 377 unconstitutional on 6th September 2018.

Keep reading... Show less