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Taliban will not Survive a Month if it lost its Sanctuary in Neighboring Pakistan, says Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

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Kandidat-kandidat presiden Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani (kanan) dan Abdullah Abdullah menandatangani kesepakatan mengenai pembagian pemerintahan persatuan di Kabul (21/9). VOA
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December 7, 2016: Ashraf Ghani, the Afghan President said on Sunday that the Taliban insurgency will not even survive a month if it loses its harbor in neighboring Pakistan.
Ghani made the remarks, at an international conference in the northern Indian city of Amritsar, which is not quite far from Pakistan border.

According to Reuters, “Pakistan said while violence had increased in Afghanistan, blaming another country for it didn’t help.”

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Last year, the highest number of civilian casualties and military-related deaths in the world was suffered in Afghanistan.

“This is unacceptable… Some still provide sanctuary for terrorists. As a Taliban figure said recently, if they had no sanctuary in Pakistan, they wouldn’t last a month,” Ghani said.

Analysts say, “Pakistan has historically backed the Afghan Taliban as a hedge against the influence of arch-rival India, with whom Pakistan has fought three wars, in its backyard.”
Pakistan does not agree to it, rather claims itself to be a victim of terrorism.

Tehrik-i-Taliban is one of the main groups carrying out attacks inside Pakistan. And, they were operating from Afghanistan.

Pakistan’s top foreign-policy adviser, Sartaj Aziz said,” It was true that there had been an upsurge in violence in Afghanistan.”

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“We need to have an objective and holistic view rather blame one country,” he told the conference.

By the conflict in Afghanistan, a number of people have been displaced this year, and it has surpassed half a million people, according to the United Nations reported last month.

Not only Taliban, Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attacks targeting minority Shi’ites in Afghanistan.

Ghani said, calling it an undeclared war in Afghanistan, “I don’t want a blame game, I want clarifications on what is being done to prevent the export of terror.”

Prime Minister Narendra Modi said, “Regional players had to act against not only the militants but their sponsors. It must be backed by resolute action. Not just against forces of terrorism, but also against those who support, shelter, train and finance them.”

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Indian officials said, “Islamabad has rejected the Indian allegations and said it was ready to hold talks with India on the dispute over Kashmir, but no talks are planned with Aziz while he is in Amritsar.”

– by NewsGram team

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As Climate Talks Come to a Halt, Africa Suffers From Global Warming

The World Health Organization warns that climate change will exacerbate the impact of some disease and health problems.

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Drought, Climate change, global warming
A farmer stands on cracked earth that three weeks earlier created the bottom of a reservoir on his farm, in Groot Marico, South Africa. VOA

Efforts to boost global action against climate change are stuttering, as several key nations have objected to a key United Nations-backed report on the impacts of rising temperatures at the COP24 talks in Poland.

Many developing nations say they are already suffering from the impact of climate change, especially in south Asia and Africa, where water shortages and intense storms are putting lives and livelihoods in danger.

In Malawi in southern Africa, a bustling fish market stood at Kachulu on the shores of Lake Chilwa just five months ago. Now, hundreds of fishing boats lie marooned across the vast bay as vultures circle over the cracked, sun-baked mud. Water levels here fluctuate annually, but scientists say climate change is making the seasonal dry-out of the lake far more dramatic. Fishermen are being forced to leave and look for work elsewhere, says Sosten Chiotha, of the non-governmental organization ‘LEAD’ – Leadership for Environment and Development.

“Climate change contributes to the current recessions that we are experiencing, because you can see that in 2012 there was a recession where the lake lost about 80 percent of its water. Then it recovered in 2013, but not fully. So since then every year we have been experiencing these recessions,” Chiotha said.

Scientists gathering at the COP24 climate talks say it is developing countries like Malawi that are being hit hardest by the impacts of climate change.

The charity Water Aid has released a report ranking the countries worst-hit by water shortages, with Sudan, Niger and Pakistan making up the top three.

“There are people who are living with the impact of climate change right now. And they’re feeling those impacts not through carbon, but through water. And as we’ve seen over the past few years and will continue to see for many years to come unfortunately, is a huge increase in water stress and absolute water scarcity,” Water Aid’s Jonathan Farr told VOA from the climate talks currently underway in the Polish city of Katowice.

Richer nations have pledged $100 billion a year for poorer nations to deal with the consequences of climate change. Water Aid says they are failing to deliver the money.

Scientists say emissions of carbon dioxide would have to be reduced by 45 percent by 2030 to have any hope of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – the target agreed in the Paris climate deal.

 

 

Global Warming, Climate Change, Africa
Climate activists attend the March for Climate in a protest against global warming in Katowice, Poland, Dec. 8, 2018, as the COP24 UN Climate Change Conference takes place in the city. VOA

However, the number of coal-fired power stations – the most polluting for

m of energy generation – is growing. The German organization ‘Urgewald’ calculates that $478 billion had been invested into expansion of the coal industry between January 2016 and September 2018.

Also Read: To Help Poor Countries Adapt To Global Warming, World Bank Doubles Its Funding

Meanwhile the World Health Organization warns that climate change will exacerbate the impact of some disease and health problems, including malaria, malnutrition and heat exposure.

Also Read: To Help Poor Countries Adapt To Global Warming, World Bank Doubles Its Funding

There is little optimism at the talks that much concrete progress will be made, as several countries including the United States, Russia and Saudi Arabia have already voiced objections to a key scientific report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (VOA)