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Tamil Nadu immigrants face problems with migration expenses

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Chennai: Raghavendran Ganesan was relatively a well-placed emigrant with roots in Tamil Nadu. He was working in a world famous Indian firm and stationed in European Union’s headquarters Brussels in Belgium.

Of course, the entire Indian administrative arm based in Brussels was searching for him after he went missing last week following an IS-triggered bomb blast on a metro train.

That was, of course, a rare situation.

And that kind of attention to each of 35 lakh people from Tamil Nadu living in various parts of the world, who remit over Rs 61,800 crore back to country, not possible even in dreams. “We have seen cases where bodies of people who died in Gulf countries not reaching their homes in Tamil Nadu for months,” says Sr M. Valarmathi, state coordinator for Migrants Forum. Chennai.

Airport sources estimate that 12 to 15 dead bodies arrive every month in the international terminal and most will be from Gulf countries. “Similarly, bodies of Tamil emigrants will be arriving at Tiruchy, Coimbatore and also in Thiruvananthapuram” a police officer said. A government survey last year found there are 3.5 million people from Tamil Nadu working abroad,  with Chennai topping the list with 3.2 lakh people, followed by Coimbatore with 1.9 lakh and Ramanathapuram 1.4 lakh. It is estimated that 15 per cent of Tamil emigrants are women.

While 22 lakh people struggle in other countries, the rest – 13 lakh people – returned home because the contract for a majority of them was not renewed last year.  While 38 per cent of the returnees said their contracts were not renewed, 19 per cent said family issues had dragged them back, eight per cent noted they were getting poor wages – very less than promised – abroad and another eight per cent decided to come back because of bad health. “It does not mean that once returned, these workers will not go back. They will try to go to another place or another country hoping to land in a better job,” Valarmathi says.

Answering a query in Parliament recently, Gen V. K. Singh, minister of state for external affairs, said the number of Indian workers who emigrated through emigration clearance to 18 notified countries has come down from 8.16 lakh in 2013 to 7.81 lakh in 2015. Singh also said  that in the last financial year the remittance back home from Indians abroad was US $ 69 billions. (Rs 4.6 lakh crore )

The survey in Tamil Nadu also found that approximately 10 lakh women in the state are left behind at home because their husbands are working abroad.
The survey showed these women, with an average schooling of 11 years, are more qualified than males in general population.  In

In general population,  average schooling for males is around 8.5 years while for women it is 7.3 years. The survey showed that nine per cent of women left behind never visited the country where their husbands are working and 97 per cent of them keep in touch with their husbands using mobile phones.

On an average, migrants from Tamil Nadu pay around Rs 1.08 lakh and half of their money is gobbled up by recruitment agencies. The survey shows that 52 per cent of emigrants had met their migration expenses on their own by family support or by borrowed money.

(Source– deccanchronicle.com)

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The Indian Civilization is Built on Successive Waves of Migration

"The Indian civilization has been built upon successive waves of migration throughout history comprising traders, soldiers, missionaries, communities escaping persecution, artists and academics and artisans seeking better opportunities," India's Deputy Permanent Representative Tanmaya Lal said on Monday.

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Indian flag. (Representational Image) Wikimedia Commons

India has acknowledged here at an international forum that its civilization was built upon successive waves of migration like most countries and it was a scientific fact.

“The Indian civilization has been built upon successive waves of migration throughout history comprising traders, soldiers, missionaries, communities escaping persecution, artists and academics and artisans seeking better opportunities,” India’s Deputy Permanent Representative Tanmaya Lal said on Monday.

“This mega diversity of our peoples is among our greatest strength,” he said at a session of the intergovernmental negotiations on a global compact on migration.

The statement comes amid heated debates in India about historic migrations, some that happened eons ago.

Lal did not get into the debate or into the specific theories or peoples but made a general statement, which mentioned “soldiers” among the wave of migrants.

He pointed out that migrations were a global phenomenon throughout history and nations have emerged through this inter-mingling.

“Most nation states and societies have been built upon waves of migration over the past several centuries,” he said.

“Science confirms that all of us are migrants. The deep and the more recent history of our migration and mixed ancestry is, in fact, recorded in our genes,” Lal added.

 

The religious babas in India are said to alleviate the sufferings of people and worked for the betterment of society.
The religious babas in India are said to alleviate the sufferings of people and worked for the betterment of society. Wikimedia Commons

“Migration has continued to expand and is now aided by the integration of economies over the last few decades,” he said.

Speaking of the benefits to the world through migration, he cited the example of Mahatma Gandhi, who studied in England and worked in South Africa, saying he is “among the most well-known international migrants who contributed hugely to our collective progress.”

Lal also mentioned the many Nobel Prize-winners of Indian descent “who made seminal contribution to science” as well as foreign-born scientists, inventors, businesspersons, artistes, sportspersons, authors, academics, doctors and political leaders “who have made an indelible mark not only on societies where they lived but globally.”

Negotiations are taking place for a global agreement to facilitate safe, orderly and regular international migration that is to be concluded in December in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Lal tried to dispel what he considered two widely held misconceptions about India and migrations.

Also Read: ‘Religion’ in India- Types and its Connection to Country’s Civilization

While India is considered to be among the top countries of origin for migrants globally, the rate of emigration from India is less than half of the world’s average, he said.

“It is much lesser known and appreciated that India is also among the major countries of destination, as also a transit country, for migrants largely from our neighbourhood,” he added. (IANS)