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TECNO Mobile launches its flagship smartphone on Flipkart. Flickr

Expanding its camera-centric portfolio, Hong Kong-based Transsion Holdings’ subsidiary TECNO Mobile on Wednesday launched three new smartphones under its “CAMON” series.

The three Artificial Intelligence (AI)-centric CAMON “iAIR2+”, “i2” and “i2X” are priced at Rs 8,999, Rs 10,499 and Rs 12,499, respectively.


“We are overwhelmed with the love and support received from our consumers and are committed to challenge ourselves to up the ante as far as camera-centric smartphones are concerned,” Gaurav Tikoo, CMO, TRANSSION India, said in a statement.

“The AI algorithm in the new range comes with a significant improvement over the earlier portfolio which can scan up to 298 facial points,” Tikoo added.


“i2X” sports 13MP+5MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera. Flickr

The entire range of devices comes with 6.2-inch HD+ screen with 19:9 “Full View” notch display. It also comes with dual rear camera setup along with front flash.

The new “iAIR2+” sports 13MP+2MP real camera and 8MP selfie camera. “i2” comes with 13MP+2MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera.

Also Read: Samsung Brings its First Smartphones With Triple Camera in India

“i2X” sports 13MP+5MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera.

The smartphones house 3,750mAh battery and come with AI “Face Unlock” and fingerprint sensor technology. (IANS)


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