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Hong Kong Based Company Tecno Launches New Smartphones

The smartphones house 3,750mAh battery and come with AI "Face Unlock" and fingerprint sensor technology.

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TECNO Mobile launches first flagship smartphone in India. Flickr

Expanding its camera-centric portfolio, Hong Kong-based Transsion Holdings’ subsidiary TECNO Mobile on Wednesday launched three new smartphones under its “CAMON” series.

The three Artificial Intelligence (AI)-centric CAMON “iAIR2+”, “i2” and “i2X” are priced at Rs 8,999, Rs 10,499 and Rs 12,499, respectively.

“We are overwhelmed with the love and support received from our consumers and are committed to challenge ourselves to up the ante as far as camera-centric smartphones are concerned,” Gaurav Tikoo, CMO, TRANSSION India, said in a statement.

“The AI algorithm in the new range comes with a significant improvement over the earlier portfolio which can scan up to 298 facial points,” Tikoo added.

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“i2X” sports 13MP+5MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera. Flickr

The entire range of devices comes with 6.2-inch HD+ screen with 19:9 “Full View” notch display. It also comes with dual rear camera setup along with front flash.

The new “iAIR2+” sports 13MP+2MP real camera and 8MP selfie camera. “i2” comes with 13MP+2MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera.

Also Read: Samsung Brings its First Smartphones With Triple Camera in India

“i2X” sports 13MP+5MP dual rear camera setup and 16MP selfie camera.

The smartphones house 3,750mAh battery and come with AI “Face Unlock” and fingerprint sensor technology. (IANS)

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Apple’s Recycling Robot Is Capable of Disassembling 200 iPhones Per Hour

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills. 

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Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year. Pixabay

 Apple on Thursday announced to expand its global recycling programmes and introduced Daisy, its recycling robot that is capable of disassembling 200 iPhones per hour.

US customers can send their iPhones to be disassembled by Daisy which is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models.

Daisy will disassemble and recycle select used iPhones returned to Best Buy stores throughout the US and KPN retailers in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement ahead of Earth Day that falls on April 22.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain. Pixabay

Apple also announced the opening of its “Material Recovery Lab” dedicated to discovering future recycling processes in Austin, Texas.

The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges.

“Advanced recycling must become an important part of the electronics supply chain, and Apple is pioneering a new path to help push our industry forward,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year.

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills.

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The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges. Pixabay

Daisy can take apart iPhones to recover materials such as cobalt, aluminum and tin, which are then recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Once materials have been recovered by Daisy, they are recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Also Read: Parkinson Treatment Possible Through A Blood Pressure Drug

For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain.

They are then combined with scrap from select manufacturing sites and, for the first time, cobalt recovered through this process is now being used to make brand-new Apple batteries. (IANS)