Thursday December 12, 2019

Teens with ADHD More Likely to Face High Road Accident Risk, Says Study

The study highlighted that drivers with ADHD had higher rates of “alcohol or drug violations and moving violations (including speeding, non-use of seat belts

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child, ADHD
The results indicate that children with ADHD who received canine assisted intervention (CAI) experienced a reduction in inattention and an improvement in social skills. Pixabay

Teenage drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to engage in rash driving, violate traffic rules and crash as compared to their contemporaries without ADHD, says a study.

In the study published in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), Pennsylvania, found that teenagers with ADHD are more likely to engage in risky driving, such as driving while intoxicated, not wearing seat belt and speeding.

“What this study suggests is that we have to go beyond current recommendations of medication and delaying the age of getting license to decrease crash risk for teens with ADHD,” said Allison E. Curry, lead author of the study and a senior scientist at CHOP.

“Their higher rate of citations suggest that risky driving behaviours may account for why they crash more,” Curry added.

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The research results may lead to better learning methods and even help people who suffer from ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) by influencing the nature and pace of their breathing. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers included identified 1,769 newly-licensed teenage drivers with childhood-diagnosed ADHD and compared their crash and traffic violation records with those of the drivers without ADHD.

The study’s findings showed that among teen drivers with ADHD, nearly 37 per cent were issued a traffic violation and nearly 27 per cent a moving violation within their first year of driving, as compared to 25 per cent and 18 per cent respectively, among those without ADHD.

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The study highlighted that drivers with ADHD had higher rates of “alcohol or drug violations and moving violations (including speeding, non-use of seat belts and electronic equipment use)”.

“We need additional research to understand the specific mechanisms by which ADHD symptoms influence crash risk so that we can develop skills training and behavioural interventions to reduce the risk for newly licensed drivers with ADHD,” said Thomas J. Power, study’s co-author and Director of the Centre for Management of ADHD at CHOP. (IANS)

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Study Says, Youth with Abnormal Heart Rythms are More Likely to Have Mental Health Issues

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2019 -- November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US

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Heart Rythms
Researchers reviewed data on more than 7,300 children with abnormal Heart Rhthms and compared them to children with congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and children with none of these chronic conditions (controls). Pixabay

Children and teenagers with abnormal Heart Rythms (cardiac arrhythmias) are more likely to have depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared to those of similar ages without chronic medical conditions, researchers have warned.

“This may be the first study of this size looking at children and teenagers with various cardiac arrhythmias that have been diagnosed with or are taking medication for anxiety and depression,” said study’s lead author Keila N. Lopez from Baylor College of Medicine in the US.

Higher rates of depression, anxiety and ADHD have previously been described in young adults born with structural heart defects (congenital heart disease).

For the study, the researchers analysed the records of more than a quarter of a million children admitted to or seen in the emergency room of Texas Children’s Hospital between 2011 and 2016.

They reviewed data on more than 7,300 children with abnormal heart rhythms and compared them to children with congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease and children with none of these chronic conditions (controls).

“We chose cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease because they are chronic diseases that are managed with medications and usually involve multiple hospitalisations,” Lopez said.

They found more than 20 per cent of kids with abnormal heart rhythms, congenital heart disease and cystic fibrosis had been diagnosed with or prescribed medication for depression and/or anxiety, compared with five per cent of children with sickle cell disease and three per cent of the control group.

Heart Rythms
Children and teenagers with abnormal Heart Rythms (cardiac arrhythmias) are more likely to have depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared to those of similar ages without chronic medical condition. Pixabay

Kids with abnormal heart rhythms were nine times more likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression and almost five times more likely to be diagnosed or treated for ADHD, compared to kids without any of the identified chronic diseases in the study.

Kids with abnormal heart rhythms were one and a half times as likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression than those with cystic fibrosis, and more than five times as likely to be diagnosed or treated for anxiety and depression than those with sickle cell disease, the study said.

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The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)