Wednesday March 20, 2019

Teens Drinking Regularly face Worse Alcohol Problems Than Adults

Discouraging or delaying alcohol use in adolescence is likely to have substantial benefits in adulthood in terms of preventing harmful drinking behaviours which adversely affect health and well-being

0
//
drinking
Representational image. Pixabay

Teens aged under 17 who drink alcohol weekly are three times more likely to binge drink and be dependent on alcohol as adults compared with their peers who don’t drink, an Australian-led research said on Wednesday.

“The study further debunks the myth that teen experimentation with alcohol promotes responsible drinking, instead it sets a young person up for later-life drinking problem,” Xinhua news agency quoted Professor George Patton from the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute as saying.

Alcohol
Teens consuming alcohol at a party. Pixabay

The researchers looked at the drinking patterns of 9,000 adolescents in Australia and New Zealand.

The findings suggest that delaying drinking alcohol would have “significant public health benefits” as well as showing that public health messages “need to focus as much on frequency of drinking as the amount consumed”, said lead author Edmund Silins.

Also Read: What Causes Alcohol Addiction?

“Discouraging or delaying alcohol use in adolescence is likely to have substantial benefits in adulthood in terms of preventing harmful drinking behaviours which adversely affect health and well-being,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

Know When Older Adults Feel Younger Than Their Age

Study participants were asked questions aimed at assessing their daily stresses, physical health, sense of control over their daily lives, and how old they felt.

0
old
"The more control older adults think they have, the younger they feel," said study co-author Shevaun Neupert, Professor at North Carolina State University in the US. Pixabay

Older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns, suggests new research.

However, stress and health — not a sense of control — play a significant role in how old younger adults feel, said the study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences.

“The more control older adults think they have, the younger they feel,” said study co-author Shevaun Neupert, Professor at North Carolina State University in the US.

old

However, an individual’s sense of control had no bearing on self-perceptions of age for young adults. But stress and adverse changes in health did make young people feel older. Pixabay

For this study, the researchers had 116 older adults (ages 60-90) and 107 younger adults (ages 18-36) fill out a daily survey for eight consecutive days. Study participants were asked questions aimed at assessing their daily stresses, physical health, sense of control over their daily lives, and how old they felt.

“Everyone’s sense of control fluctuates from day to day, or even over the course of a day — that’s normal,” Neupert said.

“We found that when older adults felt more in control, they also felt younger. That was true even when accounting for stress and physical health.”

However, an individual’s sense of control had no bearing on self-perceptions of age for young adults. But stress and adverse changes in health did make young people feel older.

brain
“Everyone’s sense of control fluctuates from day to day, or even over the course of a day — that’s normal,” Neupert said. Pixabay

Also Read: Concerns Rise Over China’s Stand at United Nations Human Rights Council

“This highlights the importance of having older adults retain some sense of autonomy,” Neupert said.

“It’s not just a nice thing to do, it actually affects their well-being.” (IANS)