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Communities and cultures celebrate periods and the start of periods.

Periods or Menstruation are extensively a taboo topic to discuss in India. A bleeding woman is seen as impure and believed that her touch is capable of polluting and causing destruction. However, some communities and cultures celebrate periods and the start of periods. They see the start of the menstrual cycle as a milestone in a woman's life as it is the transition of a girl into a "young woman". People rejoice at the beginning of the fertile period with rituals and celebrations.

Ambubachi Mela

Ambubachi Mela is an annual festival celebrated at the Kamakhya temple in Guhwahati. The roots of The Ambubachi Mela lie in Hindu Mythology. People believe that the genitalia of Goddess Sati aka Shakti fell to the ground where the temple was built. Every June the temple gates are closed off for three days when the goddess is believed to be menstruating. On the commence of the fourth day the temple doors open and devotees receive a red cloth that is supposedly soaked in the goddess' menstrual blood. Then on the seventh day of Asadha, the festival takes place at one of the major Shakti Peethas where the female genitalia of Goddess Sati is said to have fallen and a cave with natural spring was formed. Notably, Devi Kamakhya is represented by a stone shaped in the form of a vulva.

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On Diwali, people put on new clothing and proceed to temples, where they buy large quantities of sweets to distribute to friends and family.

Deepavali or Diwali is the name given to the Festival of Lights (deep-lamp, vali - array) and is celebrated by Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and certain Buddhists. The celebration lasts five days and is held during the Hindu lunisolar month of Kartika. Diwali represents the spiritual winning of light over darkness, good over evil and knowledge over ignorance.

During Diwali, people dress in their best clothes, decorate their homes with diyas and rangoli, hold worship ceremonies for Lakshmi, the goddess of prosperity and wealth, light fireworks, and gather with their families for family feasts during which sweets and gifts are exchanged.

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This total or complete One, is so significant that even if one literally decides to deduct or remove the cosmos and universe from that complete or total energy, it shall remain constant, i.e., total

OṀ SAMPŨRṆABHŨMYAI NAMAH:

OṀ (AUM) - POOR-ṆA-MA-DA-HA-BHOO-MYAI—NA-MA-HA

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This practice was carried out since the time of kings, briefly stopped during the British rule, and was reintroduced by the Wodeyars of Mysore. Image credit: wikimedia commons

On the ninth day of the Navratri celebrations, Ayudha Pooja is celebrated in Karnataka, where all the instruments of the household or shop are gathered together in one place and consecrated before the patron deity. This practice was carried out since the time of kings, briefly stopped during the British rule, and was reintroduced by the Wodeyars of Mysore.

The practice of anointing instruments is believed to have originated during the Kurukshethra war, when Arjuna placed his weapons in the Shami tree before using them in the war. He won the war after doing this, and so people do the same to their household objects believing that it holds great significance to their prosperity and success.

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