Wednesday February 19, 2020

Test Colon and Rectal Cancer Earlier To Prevent Death

Clorectal cancer: second leading cause of death in U.S.

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Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, who is pediatrician, passes through an inflatable colon display in Sacramento, Calif., March 24, 2014. The display shows what a healthy colon looks like, how polyps develop and how they can turn cancerous. The American Cancer Society now urges screening tests to detect colorectal cancer earlier, at age 45.
Assemblyman Richard Pan, D-Sacramento, who is pediatrician, passes through an inflatable colon display in Sacramento, Calif., March 24, 2014. The display shows what a healthy colon looks like, how polyps develop and how they can turn cancerous. The American Cancer Society now urges screening tests to detect colorectal cancer earlier, at age 45. VOA

The American Cancer Society is recommending people start test and screening for colon and rectal cancer at age 45, rather than 50 as currently prescribed.

It also recommends people who are in good health and with a life expectancy of more than 10 years continue regular colorectal cancer screening through the age of 75.

The group said the initial test does not have to be a colonoscopy, but instead could be one of several non-invasive tests, such as a home stool test available by prescription.

“All of these tests are good tests, and the choice should be offered to patients,” said the cancer society’s Dr. Rich Wender. “The best test is the test that gets done.”

Human digestive system
Human digestive system, Representational image, Pixabay

The change in procedure is based on new information about a marked increase in the incidences of colorectal cancer, particularly rectal cancer, among younger individuals. Experts aren’t sure why there has been a 50 percent increase in cases since 1994.

Most colon cancer occurs in adults 55 and older, and the good news is that rates of cases and deaths have been falling for decades. Colon cancer, combined with rectal cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.

Also read: Toothpaste ingredient promote colon cancer

This year, more than 140,000 Americans are expected to be diagnosed with it, and about 50,000 will die from it. (VOA)

Next Story

Weight-Loss Surgery May Help in Reducing Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Study

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals

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Cancer
Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer. Pixabay

Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study, published in the British Journal of Surgery (BJS), showed that patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a greater than 35 per cent reduction in the risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with obese individuals who had no surgery.

“Day by day, the scientific community is continuing to uncover the benefits of weight- loss surgery, and this paper affirms this,” said study lead author Sulaiman Almazeedi from Jaber Al-Ahmed Hospital in Kuwait.

“Obesity today remains one of the most preventable causes of morbid disease and early death, and despite the controversy, we believe weight-loss surgery can be an important tool in tackling this epidemic,” Almazeedi added.

Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer.

According to the researchers, the BJS analysis, which included seven studies with a total of 12,13,727 patients and an average follow-up of seven years, was conducted because individual studies have presented conflicting results.

Cancer
Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Pixabay

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals.

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The overall risk of developing colorectal cancer was three in 1,000 in patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery, compared with four in 1,000 in those who did not, the study said. (IANS)