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Texas Gunman Practiced Target on Animals Ahead of the Shooting Massacre: Ex Colleague

Jessika Edwards, who worked with Kelley at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 to 2012, said Kelley told her that he was "using the dogs as target practice".

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Texas gunman
Markers are seen at the front f the building as law enforcement officials continue to investigate the scene of a shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. A man opened fire inside the church in the small South Texas community on Sunday, killing and wounding many. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) (VOA)

Washington, November 10, 2017 : Devin Kelley, the gunman who killed 26 persons inside a church in Texas, had claimed that he bought animals for target practice, according to a former Air Force colleague.

Jessika Edwards, who worked with Kelley at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 to 2012, said Kelley told her that he was “using the dogs as target practice”.

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The morbid admission came in Facebook messages starting in 2014, Edwards told CNN.

Though Edwards was not sure if the Texas gunman was telling the truth, the odd behavior was enough for her to stop communicating with him.

Kelley was accused in 2014 of punching a dog in Colorado. He initially pleaded guilty to animal cruelty, but the case was dismissed after he paid fines.

Edwards said the Texas gunman also displayed a fascination with mass murders while he was enlisted in the Air Force.

“He would make jokes about
wanting to kill somebody…
And we would say,
‘wait, that’s not funny’.”

The obsession was so pronounced, Edwards said, that when Kelley was disciplined for poor performance she told her bosses to “back off or he would shoot the place up”.

“He was always getting into trouble… It was problem after problem,” Edwards said.

A law enforcement source confirmed to CNN that FBI agents interviewed Edwards about her interactions with the gunman.

In 2012, Kelley was court-martialed and convicted for assaulting his wife and stepson.

Edwards said those domestic problems boiled over in the job and Kelley would come in depressed and unfocused.

After the shooting massacre on November 5, the Air Force has been criticised for failing to notify federal law enforcement officials of Kelley’s conviction.

Kelley was dressed in black and wearing a bullet-proof vest when he attacked the church in Sutherland Springs, a quiet town some 45 km southeast of San Antonio.

The victims ranged from under two-years-old to 77. (IANS)

 

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Uber Agrees to Pay $4.4 Million to Victims of Sexual Harassment in its Workplace

Uber's Chief Legal Officer Tony West promised to ensure that all company employees can thrive at Uber by "putting fairness and accountability at the heart of who we are and what we do."

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Uber, bengaluru
Photo shows an exterior view of the headquarters of Uber in San Francisco. (VOA)

The US ride-hailing company Uber Technologies Inc. has agreed to pay $4.4 million to settle federal investigations into claims of sexual harassment within the company, a federal commission has said.

“Uber will set up a $4.4 million fund to compensate anyone who “experienced sexual harassment and/or related retaliation after January 1, 2014,” the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) said on Wednesday.

The settlement was a result of a 2017 commission probe in which “the EEOC found reasonable cause to believe that Uber permitted a culture of sexual harassment and retaliation against individuals who complained about such harassment,” said the commission, Xinhua news agency reported.

The San Francisco-based ride-hailing tech company also agreed to establish a system for identifying employees who complain about sexual harassment and managers who fail to respond to concerns of sexual harassment in a timely manner, it added.

Uber India
A campaign by Uber will empower youth and women in India. Wikimedia Commons

A third-party representative will monitor Uber for three years to improve the company’s workplace culture.

“This resolution demonstrates the benefits of working cooperatively with the EEOC and serves as a model for businesses committed to truly leveling the playing field where opportunity is not circumscribed by one’s gender,” said EEOC Chair Janet Dhillon.

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EEOC San Francisco District Director William Tamayo admitted that the tech industry has often ignored allegations of sexual harassment “when an accused harasser is seen as more valuable to the company than the accuser.”

Uber’s Chief Legal Officer Tony West promised to ensure that all company employees can thrive at Uber by “putting fairness and accountability at the heart of who we are and what we do.” (IANS)