Friday October 20, 2017
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The fight for Kashmir : The partition

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photo credit : quora

By Shriya Katoch 

The fight over Kashmir is a long and bloody one. With thousands of lives lost on both sides during the partition. India has fought three wars with Pakistan over Kashmir, emerging as the victor in all.
It all started in 1947 when the British gave up India and created two independent states the Union of India and Dominion of Pakistan. It was said that majority of the Muslim population was going to reside in Pakistan and its counterpart Hindu population would reside in India . States were then given the free will to decide whether they wanted to join Pakistan or India or become independent .

At the time Kashmir was ruled over by Maharaja Hari Singh,  a Hindu ruler, while the state was Muslim dominant. However Maharaja Hari Singh was a fair and a just ruler, not discriminating on the basis of religion. In fact he had appointed many Muslims in his court. This was refreshing as majority of Muslim rulers in the past had subjected Hindus to cruelty and forceful conversions.
The fate of Kashmir was still undecided. Pakistan made several attempts to lure Maharaja Hari Singh to become a part of Kashmir with Mohammed Ali Jinnah even having written a letter to Maharaja Hari Singh promising “every sort of favourable treatment”.
Frustrated by the Maharaja’s indecision the Muslim league encouraged the locals to revolt at Poonch. Later in September Muslim League officials in the Northwest Frontier Province, including the Chief Minister Abdul Qayyum Khan, assisted and possibly organized a large-scale invasion of Kashmir by Pathan tribesmen.
Hari Singh the Maharaja of Kashmir believed that by delaying the decision he was increasing the chances of Kashmir becoming an independent State, but due to the attempted invasion by Pakistan he signed an instrument of accession on 25 October 1947 to the Indian union in return for military aid. The National Conference party the largest party in the State, endorsed the accession and in the words of National conference leader Syed Mir Qasim, India had the “legal” as well as “moral” justification to send in the army through the Maharaja’s accession and the people’s support to it.
In modern times Pakistan still refuses to accept that legally Kashmir belongs to India because of their failed attempt of invading Kashmir. This failed invasion made the population of Kashmir view them as raiders. Pakistan cannot claim their right on Kashmir just on the basis that the majority of the population residing in Kashmir is Muslim. Its time that they learn to bury the hatchet and accept defeat.

Also, do read elated article on Kashmir :http://www.newsgram.com/paradise-on-earth-the-uncovered-truth-of-kashmir/

Shriya Katoch multitasks as an Engineering student,an avid reader,a guitar player and a death note fan. Twitter: @katochshriya538

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UN General Assembly: Pakistan Representative Maleeha Lodhi goofs up, labels Gaza photo as Kashmir’s

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Maleeha Lodhi at UN General Assembly
Maleeha Lodhi at UN General Assembly

United Nations, Sep 24: In a failed attempt to counter India at the UN General Assembly, Pakistan’s Representative Maleeha Lodhi tried to pass off a distorted fact. She displayed a disturbing picture of Gaza and labelled it as the “face of Indian democracy”.

Lodhi was responding to Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj’s description of Pakistan as a “pre-eminent export factory for terror” at UN General Assembly 2017.

The photo, Lodhi displayed at the UN General Assembly to show Indian “atrocities” in Jammu and Kashmir was of 17-year-old Rawya Abu Jom. In reality, the picture is of 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict, where two Israeli airstrikes hit Rawya Abu Jom, family’s apartment in Gaza.

Exercising the Right of Reply, Maleeha Lodhi accused India of “crimes against humanity” and of carrying out a “campaign of brutality” in the Kashmir Valley. To prove her point, she held the photo of the girl whose face was riddled with wounds.

The photo has been featured in many photo galleries online, including by the New York Times and the Guardian.(IANS)

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Bollywood Megastars Hema Malini and Amitabh Bachchan Promote New Short-film ‘Vaadi-e-Kashmir’

Kashmir's mountains, greenery and the beautiful shikaras; Vaadi-e-Kashmir aims to touch the heart of the Kashmiri brothers and sisters

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Vaadi-e-kashmir
Vaadi-e-Kashmir aims to make our brothers and sisters in Kashmir feel that the rest of the country stands with them. YouTube

Kashmir, September 7, 2017 : Bollywood megastar Amitabh Bachchan and veteran actress-politician Hema Malini have featured in “Vaadi-e-Kashmir”, a short film aimed at spreading the message of oneness.

“As an Indian, this film is my attempt to reach out to Kashmir and touch the hearts of our brothers and sisters in the valley,” Hema, who has also curated the film, said in a statement.

Vaadi-e-Kashmir
Veteran actress-politician Hema Malini has featured in “Vaadi-e-Kashmir”, a short film aimed at spreading the message of oneness. IANS

‘Vaadi-e-Kashmir’ will make you fall in love with the people of Kashmir 

“Vaadi-e-Kashmir”, which captures the valley’s beauty and people, is supported by KENT RO Systems Ltd, and has music and lyrics by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and Gulzar. It is directed by filmmaker Pradeep Sarkar and conceptualised by Praveen Kenneth, Chairman – Law & Kenneth Saatchi & Saatchi.

Talking about his experience of shooting the film over two weeks in Kashmir, Sarkar said in statement: “Falling in love at the age of 62 years is possible… It happened to me when I went and met Kashmir. Though it was my first trip to Kashmir, it seemed like I knew the place.”

“The warm and friendly people just make you feel at home instantly. In this film, I tried to capture her beauty… but I want to go back to capture her beauty unawares — and also to know her a little better. Believe it, we all need to know her a little better.”

#DilSeKashmir : Watch ‘Vaadi-e-Kashmir Trailer 

Amitabh gives a key message at the start of the movie, which showcases Kashmir’s mountains, greenery and shikaras.

The vision of the six minutes long film is to make our brothers and sisters in Kashmir feel that the rest of the country stands with them and also open many more doors to bring us closer to one another, said Mahesh Gupta, Chairman – KENT RO.

“Vaadi-e-Kashmir” also calls viewers to log on to www.dilsekashmir.com, a platform for the people across the nation to send a message of love to the people of Kashmir. (IANS)

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Fillmaker Gurinder Chadha’s “Partition: 1947” Banned from Release in Pakistan over “misrepresentation” of Muhammad Ali Jinnah

  The film narrates the story of the trauma that people went through due to the division, and how it changed their lives

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Partition: 1947 by Gurinder Chadha film poster
Partition: 1947 by Gurinder Chadha film poster. Twitter
  • It is unfortunate my film has been banned in Pakistan
  • She went back to trace her roots and document events that led to India’s Partition
  • The political narrative contradicts the national interest of Pakistan

New Delhi August 22, 2017: Filmmaker Gurinder Chadha’s “Partition: 1947” – the Hindi version of period drama “Viceroy’s House” has been banned from releasing in Pakistan, reportedly over “misrepresentation” of Muhammad Ali Jinnah. The director says it’s unfortunate.

“It is unfortunate my film has been banned in Pakistan. It will always be the land of my ancestors. ‘Partition: 1947’,” Chadha posted on Twitter on August 20.

 “Partition: 1947” was released internationally as “Viceroy’s House”. For the film, the British film director of Sikh origin, whose mother grew up in Rawalpindi, went back to trace her roots and document events that led to India’s Partition.

The film narrates the story of the trauma that people went through due to the division, and how it changed their lives. Featuring Hugh Bonneville, Gillian Anderson, Huma Qureshi and Manish Dayal, the movie released in India on August 18.

According to The Express Tribune, the Sindh Film Censor Board deemed it unsuitable, stating that “the political narrative contradicts the national interest of Pakistan”.

The Board’s secretary Abdul Razzaq Khuhawar said: “It’s a historical film and nothing negative is shown against Pakistan. The main reason for banning it was the misrepresentation of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah.

“We felt his character was not portrayed correctly and it felt strange. Although the character only appears in a few scenes as the film mostly revolves around Lord Mountbatten, the actor didn’t look like Jinnah at all. If you had seen it, you couldn’t tell it was Jinnah. Otherwise, there were no issues with the film.” (IANS)