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The funny side of impressing women

Bruce Rowley was arrested as he left Taylor's home in Rhode Island a few days ago. Bruce, you do NOT impress wealthy women by throwing cash over the fences of their mansions. You throw property deeds, credit cards and in your case, I think vasectomy papers would be essential.

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More evidence that most men have NO IDEA how women think
Only 2 per cent women promoted to lead tech teams: Survey. pixabay

Useful tip: Guys, end every sentence you speak to a woman with, “But I could be wrong”. This saves time. Example: “Good morning! But I could be wrong!”

That thought was inspired by a news item I just read. A man robbed a bank and then threw some of the money over singer Taylor Swift’s fence “to impress her”.

More evidence that most men have NO IDEA how women think.

Bruce Rowley was arrested as he left Taylor’s home in Rhode Island a few days ago. Bruce, you do NOT impress wealthy women by throwing cash over the fences of their mansions. You throw property deeds, credit cards and in your case, I think vasectomy papers would be essential.

More evidence that most men have NO IDEA how women think
Representational image, pixabay

It reminded me of a case in India where a young man stole a train for his girlfriend. Ketan Kumar, 24, thought his beloved would be pleased to be presented with the 8.20 p.m. express to Amrapali. Sadly for him, both girlfriend and police were significantly unimpressed. Ketan, buddy, you need to know more about how girls think. Big, ugly steaming lump of metal? Great for guys. But for girls? No.

A colleague, hearing about this column’s topic, forwarded me a news video from Chechnya. It shows a five-year-old boy walking down the street hand-in-hand with his girlfriend. He swiftly breaks into a car and turns on the engine to show off. The five-year-old girl, way smarter than her companion, swiftly backs away while he drives off, pursued by adults.

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This all adds to the tonnes of evidence that males are born thinking women are impressed by extreme stupidity and immorality, and it takes us years — let’s be honest, decades — to realise this is not the case.

Young males should take advice from fathers of girls, who are forced to learn something about the young female brain. For example, I now know that fathering a daughter means pretending you’re thrilled when they spend half your salary having an eighth of an inch cut off their hair. The tricky thing is that they don’t tell you whether they’ve had an invisible haircut, their eyebrows plucked or a complete head transplant, but just burst through the door saying: “Well, Dad, what do you think?” You MUST reply: “It looks great” and then leave the country before there are any follow-up questions.

In fact, when a young woman asks her father for his opinion on any matter, what she is really saying is: “I wish to hear my opinion repeated in a deeper voice.”

Stop press: A colleague forwards another example. On April 24, several media reported that a man named Zach Doell decided to pick up his girlfriend from the University of Louisiana in a different funny vehicle every day, including the Batmobile, a car that looked like a giant hot dog, and an ice cream van.

He thought this was highly impressive. His, er, thrilled girlfriend Brianna Garcia told the media it was “embarrassing”.

So there you have it. It is this columnist’s fervent hope that this information will help young men and young women understand each other and communicate better.

But I could be wrong. (IANS)

 

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Education Protects Women Against Memory Loss: Researchers

The study also suggests that early-life education improves memory in women

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Education protects older adults, especially women, against memory loss, say researchers. Pixabay

Education appears to protect older adults, especially women, against memory loss, say researchers, suggesting that children, especially girls, who attend school for longer will have better memory abilities in old age.

The study published in the journal Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, tested declarative memory in 704 older adults (58-98 years of age). Declarative memory refers to our ability to remember events, facts, and words, such as where you put your keys or the name of that new neighbour.

“Evidence suggests that girls often have better declarative memory than boys, so education may lead to greater knowledge gains in girls,” said study’s senior investigator Michael Ullman from Georgetown University in the US.

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“Education may thus particularly benefit memory abilities in women, even years later in old age,” Ullman added. Participants were shown drawings of objects and then were tested several minutes later on their memory of these objects. The findings showed that their memory performance became progressively worse with ageing.

However, more years of early-life education countered these losses, especially in women. In men, the memory gains associated with each year of education were two times larger than the losses experienced during each year of ageing. However, in women, the gains were five times larger. For example, the declarative memory abilities of an 80-year-old woman with a bachelor’s degree would be as good as those of a 60-year-old woman with high school education. So, four extra years of education make up for the memory losses from 20 years of ageing.

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Early-life education improves memory and counters memory loss in women. Pixabay

The results suggest that girls who attend school for longer will have better memory abilities in old age. This may have implications for memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. “Education has also been found to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. We believe that our findings may shed light on why this occurs,” Ullman said.

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“Since learning new information in declarative memory is easier if it is related to the knowledge we already have, more knowledge from more education should result in better memory abilities, even years later,” said study’s lead author Jana Reifegerste.

“These findings may be important, especially considering the rapidly ageing population globally. The results argue for further efforts to increase access to education,” Reifegerste added. (IANS)

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Young Women More Likely to Depend on Alcohol to Improve Mental Health: Researchers

The study also tells that young women are more affected by alcohol use than men

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A recent study tells that young women appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than me leading to less interest in academics. Pixabay

Female college students are more likely to depend on drinking alcohol to improve mental well-being, say, researchers, adding that the young women appear to be more affected by high alcohol use than men, which may lead to less interest in academics.

“Cognitive aptitudes of young women appear to be more affected than for men with high alcohol use,” said study lead author Lina Begdache, Assistant Professor at Binghamton University in the US.

“These behaviors are regulated by the limbic system of the brain. However, the cognitive functions for high drinking alcohol use among the young men and women were different,” Begdache added.

For the findings, published in the journal Trends in Neuroscience and Education, researchers sought to compare neurobehaviours and academic effort among college students with low alcohol use with those of high alcohol consumption and build conceptual models that represent the integration of the different variables.

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The study found that young men and women exhibit common behavioural responses to high alcohol. Pixabay

They sent an anonymous survey to assess college students’ alcohol use and frequency along with questions on sleep, academic performance and attitude toward learning. They compared gender responses and found that both young men and women exhibit common behavioural responses to high alcohol use such as abuse of other substances and risk-taking.

The findings showed that young women reported generally less interest in the academic work and performance than young men. The latter reported more risky behaviours, such as being arrested, from excessive drinking.

The study also found that young women are more likely to depend on alcohol to improve mental well-being, which is also concerning, as they may self-medicate through drinking. In both genders, the researchers reported an increase in impulsive behaviours, which are under the control of the limbic system (the oldest part of the brain, evolutionary speaking).

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The study also found that young women are more likely to depend on alcohol to improve mental well-being. Pixabay

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Another reason for the difference seen is the differential metabolism of alcohol. Women metabolise alcohol at a slower rate, therefore, they are more likely to feel the effect of alcohol. Consequently, their brain is more likely to accumulate a toxic metabolite, acetaldehyde, which may be altering brain chemistry further to add to the differential behaviours identified in this study.

“Academic performance and risky behaviours among college students may be linked to their drinking habits, so more education and awareness should be shared with college students,” said Begdache.

“These findings are also explained by the fact that women tend to have higher connectivity between cortices, while men have a large cortical volume in the areas on the limbic system that support impulsivity,” Begdache added. (IANS)

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Young Scientist Develops Panic Button to Tackle Domestic Violence

If a distressed woman presses the button then it would alert the police or people nearby about violence

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A panic button has been developed to tackle crime against women. Pixabay

By Vivek Tripathi

The panic button, devised by an electronics and communication engineer, is set to play an important role in tackling domestic violence. On being pressed, it would alert the police or people nearby about violence.

Developed by young scientist Anjali Srivastava, the device uses GPS (Global Positioning System) technology.

Anjali, who has made several such tools, told IANS one to five emergency panic buttons could be added to it. “It operates in a 100-metre range and is too tiny to be noticed. Its battery last nearly 8 months. Women can keep the button that costs Rs 2,500 anywhere in the house as per their convenience,” she said.

It also has an audio-recording option, which could later serve as evidence. It could be used by housewives and girls living in paying guest (PG) accommodations.

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The button uses GPS to track the location of the victim. Pixabay

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“This type of innovative devices helps prevent crime against women,” said Gorakhpur scientific officer Mahadev Pandey.

“Anjali has made many such devices in the past, including anti-rape jeans and shocking gloves. This device is very important for the safety of women. It will prove to be very effective, especially in the coronavirus time,” said Shyam Cherasia, research and development in-charge of Ashoka Institute of Technology and Management.

GPS, a radio navigation system, allows land, sea, and airborne users to determine their exact location, velocity, and time 24 hours a day, in all weather conditions, anywhere in the world. (IANS)