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The Importance of Durva Grass to worship Lord Ganesha in Hinduism: Read On!

Durva means “which is cut or eaten by animals” in Sanskrit and is used to worship Lord Ganesha

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Devotees carry an idol of the Hindu elephant god Ganesh for immersion into the Arabian Sea on the last day of the Ganesh Chaturthi festival in Mumbai, September 29, 2012. Ganesh idols are taken through the streets in a procession accompanied by dancing and singing and later immersed in a river or the sea symbolising a ritual seeing-off of his journey towards his abode, taking away with him the misfortunes of all mankind. Image source: REUTERS/Vivek Prakash (INDIA - Tags: RELIGION SOCIETY) ORG XMIT: MUM10
  • In the Bhavishya Purana, Durva is stated to have appeared from Lord Vishnu’s hands and thighs as he bolstered Mount Mandara during the Samudra Manthan
  • 88,000 sages conducted Archana for the Lord Ganesha with 21 blades of the Durva grass which cured his stomach from the heat of swallowing a demon
  •  Durva is tied together, dipped in water for freshness, and then offer to the deity’s feet first and then the rest of the body

The Durva grass has long been used in Hindu rituals, especially by those who worship Lord Ganesha. Durva means “which is cut or eaten by animals” in Sanskrit. The Rig Veda and the Atharvana Veda mention the Durva grass. In the Bhavishya Purana, Durva is stated to have appeared from Lord Vishnu’s hands and thighs as he bolstered Mt. Mandara during the Samudra Manthan. Moreover, in the Vamana Purana, Durva surfaced from the tail of Vasuki, the snake used to churn the Ocean during the same Manthana.

Ganesh Festival with Durva grass at idol's feet. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Ganesh Puja, Durva grass offered at idol’s feet. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Legend has it that, in the Puranas, once while Lord Ganesha was meditating, a celestial singer disturbed him to extend an invitation of marriage. After the god rejected her proposal, she cursed him. This caused a burning sensation on his head for which Ganesha placed Durva on his head. The Durva grass offered relief and resulted in recuperation.

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However, the most popular of the fables is that there was once a demon called Analasur who petrified the world and the gods. The gods asked Lord Shiva to protect them from the demon and in return Shiva pointed them to Lord Ganesha. So, they then approached Ganesha who fought a ferocious battle with Analasur and ended up swallowing him to protect the gods.

Durva Grass is offered to Ganesha along with HIs favourite food, Modak. Image source: wiralfeed.wordpress.com
Durva Grass is offered to Ganesha along with HIs favourite food, Modak. Image source: wiralfeed.wordpress.com

This built-up a lot of heat in his body and caused him duress. The Lord Indra then gave him the moon to wear on his forehead, and Lord Vishnu gave him a lotus flower, but none could cool him down. The Lord Vishnu made it rain on Ganesha, but to no yield. Finally, 88,000 sages conducted Archana for the Lord with 21 blades of the Durva grass which cured his stomach.

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It is for this reason that Lord Ganesha is worshipped with 21 blades of the grass on Ganesh Chaturthi each year. Durva is also known to attract the Ganapati Principle the most. The use of odd numbers (minimum of 21) of the grass further promotes the entry of the divine energy into the idol. Durva is tied together, dipped in water for freshness, and then offer to the deity’s feet first and then the rest of the body. This is said to attract Ganesha the best as the principle of a deity is strongest though the feet of an idol.

by Varsha Gupta of NewsGram. Twitter: @VarshaGupta94

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)