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The WhatsApp application is known to all of us; to put it another way, it is almost impossible to find someone who owns a smartphone and does not use WhatsApp.

The history of WhatsApp must be heard since it is unlike any other startup tale. WhatsApp was not created by college kids but rather by individuals in their thirties who were employed by a well-known company and had solid employment to fall back on. The WhatsApp application is known to all of us; to put it another way, it is almost impossible to find someone who owns a smartphone and does not use WhatsApp.

In recent years, WhatsApp has established itself as the standard smartphone application for real-time communication. Even though it has faced fierce competition, it has maintained its position as the market leader in terms of downloads. When Android devices first came into the market, it was obvious that android applications were available very scarcely. But, it was the perfect opportunity for developers and businessmen to try their luck by coming up with innovative ideas and goals, and this is where Brian Acton and Jan Koum come into the scene.


person holding black android smartphone In recent years, WhatsApp has established itself as the standard smartphone application for real-time communication. | Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash


WhatsApp was created in 2009 by Brian Acton and Jan Koum, who had previously worked together at Yahoo!. The company's origin started when they decided to quit their jobs to travel around the world. However, their money quickly began to dwindle, and they were forced to apply for a job at Facebook, which did not turn out as well as they had hoped. They were distraught, but this setback spurred them to go on a new life adventure - WhatsApp.

Jan Koum chose the name "WhatsApp" to make it seem like "What's up." When Koum purchased an iPhone in early 2009, he saw the possibility of operating the newly developed app via the Apple App Store. WhatsApp was initially intended to be used only for status updates. With the help of Apple's push-notification update, which reminded users about the installed apps that they haven't used, WhatsApp reminded users via notification when someone posted a new status update. Users, on the other hand, immediately embraced it as an instant messaging service. This sowed the seeds for what the app would become in the following years.

Whatsapp Logo Website - Jan Koum chose the name "WhatsApp" to make it seem like "What's up." | Pixabay


WhatsApp 2.0 was the first version of the application to include the messaging functionality, which has since been the service's distinguishing feature. As WhatsApp's popularity grew, it drew the attention of investors. WhatsApp was valued at $1.5 billion in February 2013. Aside from the venture capitals, several other parties were interested in investing at this time. Facebook saw this new messaging network as a possible competitor with its service.

In February 2014, Facebook announced its intention to purchase WhatsApp for an astounding $19 billion. This is Facebook's biggest purchase to date and one of the largest in technology history. Following Facebook's acquisition of WhatsApp in 2014, the messaging app's growth accelerated. Every day, users of WhatsApp make over 2 billion minutes of voice and video chats and exchange around 65 million messages, according to a statement by Facebook. Although there are alternative messaging applications available on the worldwide market, WhatsApp is unquestionably the industry leader.

Mark Zuckerberg on stage at Facebook's F8 Developers Conference 2015 In February 2014, Facebook announced its intention to purchase WhatsApp for an astounding $19 billion. | Wikimedia Commons


WhatsApp is now used by more than 1.5 billion people in 180 countries. WhatsApp CEO Mark Zuckerberg is putting all he has into taking the service to a new level in the commercial sector. WhatsApp has almost replaced SMS, MMS, and other obsolete features. Since the pandemic, it has become an essential part of everyone's life as it is the only common source of communication among companies, educational institutions, friends, and family.

Both Koum and Acton took the risk of establishing a business that turned out to be a great success for them. The Whatsapp team chose to prioritize its users above earning money by not permitting advertisements. This is one of the primary reasons why Whatsapp is still widely used and adored by its users to this very day.


Keywords: zuckerberg, acquisition, leader, leader, application, service, messaging, facebook, whatsapp, story


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