Tuesday March 19, 2019
Home Indian Diaspora There’s...

There’s Evidence to Open Case Against Donald Trump: Indian-American Attorney Preet Bharara

Mr Bharara said in the ABC News interview that watching how Mr Comey's interactions with Mr Trump and how his firing played out "felt a little bit like deja vu".

0
//
Department of Justice
The Department of Justice has obtained search warrants; one of which was issued for the DisruptJ20 Facebook page, which organized protests upon President Trump's inauguration (VOA).
  • The former US attorney for the Southern District of New York made the remarks in an ABC news interview on Sunday night
  • Mr Bharara was in office until March when he and 45 other US attorneys remaining as holdovers from the former President Barack Obama’s administration were asked to step down
  • The Indian-American said Mr Trump, when he was still the president-elect, made a series of “unusual phone calls” to him

New York, June 12, 2017: Indian-American prosecutor Preet Bharara who was fired by Donald Trump’s administration in March, has said that said there were “absolute evidence” to begin a case for obstruction of justice against the President, the media reported. The former US attorney for the Southern District of New York made the remarks in an ABC news interview on Sunday night when asked whether he believed that there was enough evidence for a case claiming that Trump tried to obstruct the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) probe into former national security adviser, Michael Flynn’s ties with Russian officials.

“There is absolutely evidence to begin a case for obstruction of justice by Trump,” Mr Bharara said in his first television interview since being fired by Trump in March.

“No one knows right now whether there is a provable case of obstruction… there’s no basis to say there’s no obstruction.”

ALSO READ: Can US President Donald Trump be Indicted for Obstruction of Justice?

Mr Bharara was in office until March when he and 45 other US attorneys remaining as holdovers from the former President Barack Obama’s administration were asked to step down.

Mr Bharara, a friend and former colleague of James Comey — the FBI director fired by Trump in May — attended the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on June 8 when Mr Comey testified about conversations he had with the President about the agency’s overall Russia investigation and its probe into Flynn.

Mr Bharara said in the ABC News interview that watching how Mr Comey’s interactions with Mr Trump and how his firing played out “felt a little bit like deja vu”.

The Indian-American said Mr Trump, when he was still the president-elect, made a series of “unusual phone calls” to him.

“In reporting the phone call to the chief of staff to the attorney general I said, it appeared to be that he was trying to cultivate some kind of relationship,” Mr Bharara said.

“It’s a very weird and peculiar thing for a one-on-one conversation without the attorney general, without warning between the president and me or any United States attorney who has been asked to investigate various things and is in a position hypothetically to investigate business interests and associates of the President.”

After Trump took office, Mr Bharara refused to take one of Mr Trump’s calls.

“The call came in. I got a message. We deliberated over it, thought it was inappropriate to return the call. And 22 hours later I was asked to resign along with 45 other people,” Mr Bharara said.

“To this day I have no idea why I was fired,” Mr Bharara added. (IANS)

Next Story

White House Condemns Any Link of President Donald Trump to Accused New Zealand Shooter

Trump was widely attacked in the aftermath of a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017 when he equated white supremacists with counter-protesters, saying "both sides" were to blame and that there were "fine people" on both sides of the protest.

0
U.S.
In this Jan. 2, 2019, file photo White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting at the White House in Washington. VOA

The White House on Sunday rejected any attempt to link President Donald Trump to the white supremacist accused of gunning down 50 people at two New Zealand mosques.

“The president is not a white supremacist,” acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told the “Fox News Sunday” show. “I’m not sure how many times we have to say that. Let’s take what happened in New Zealand [Friday] for what it is: a terrible evil tragic act.”

Donald Trump
The statement renewed criticism that Trump has not voiced strong enough condemnation of white nationalists. VOA

Alleged gunman Brenton Harris Tarrant, a 28-year-old Australian, said in a 74-page manifesto he released shortly before the massacre unfolded at mosques in Christchurch that he viewed Trump as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose” but did not support his policies.

The statement renewed criticism that Trump has not voiced strong enough condemnation of white nationalists.

Asked Friday after the mosque attacks whether he sees an increase in white nationalism, Trump said, “I don’t really. I think it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems, I guess.” He said he had not seen the manifesto.

Mulvaney said, “I don’t think it’s fair to cast this person as a supporter of Donald Trump any more than it is to look at his eco-terrorist passages in that manifesto and align him with [Democratic House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi or Ms. Ocasio-Cortez,” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democratic congresswoman.

“This was a disturbed individual, an evil person,” he said.

Donald Trump
“The president is not a white supremacist,” acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told the “Fox News Sunday” show. “I’m not sure how many times we have to say that. Let’s take what happened in New Zealand [Friday] for what it is: a terrible evil tragic act.” VOA
Scott Brown, the U.S. ambassador to New Zealand, told CNN that he gave no credence to Tarrant’s comments about Trump in the manifesto, saying the accused gunman “is rotten to the core.” Brown said he hopes Tarrant is convicted “as quickly as he can be” and the key to his prison cell thrown away.

Also Read: Did You Know? IOM States Latin America as World’s Deadliest Route for Migrants

Trump was widely attacked in the aftermath of a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017 when he equated white supremacists with counter-protesters, saying “both sides” were to blame and that there were “fine people” on both sides of the protest.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, one of numerous Democrats seeking the party’s presidential nomination to oppose Trump in the 2020 election, said on Twitter after the New Zealand attack, “Time and time again, this president has embraced and emboldened white supremacists and instead of condemning racist terrorists, he covers for them. This isn’t normal or acceptable.” (VOA)