Monday December 10, 2018
Home World Third Gender:...

Third Gender: An Identity which Awaits Recognition and Acceptance!

Transgender is generally understood to be a broad category encompassing many gender identities and expressions

0
//
recognize us as a part of the society and not a flaw of the society
Third gender, Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint

Nov 17, 2016: Identity classification is of foremost in any country, be it a developing nation or a developed country, its acceptance of an individual categorically chooses two identities: male and female. As if they are only the sole granter of being an ideal citizen.

It is pretty strange that the third gender identity has existed for several decades but they still suffer from an identity crisis. Their existence in the society is still questionable and tough for the common people to accept. The word transgender gained widespread popularity in the 1990s as an umbrella term to describe people who cross over – or trans – traditional gender roles.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

ALSO WATCH:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AmciWloKd8

Currently, transgender is generally understood to be a broad category encompassing many gender identities and expressions, including transsexual, genderqueer and cross-dresser, among many other. Though the term transgender has only been used in print for about 50 years, transgender-related practices have existed throughout history. For example, in the late 18th century, a male-born French diplomat named Chevalier d’Éon famously identified, dressed and passed as a woman for more than 30 years.

Most of them consider their birth as ‘the single biggest regret of their life’. Is it their fault or is the backwardness of the society that compel them to curse their birth. This is the biggest challenge that we are facing even today. The answer is none. We tend to follow the guidelines of our country and when a country itself doesn’t recognize a community how can they expect the layman to do so. When we boastfully talk of nationalism, secularism, equality do we even think of including this section of society within our debate? No, we never do that because it is always either a male or a female or else it has no identity.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The atrocity on the third gender and the violence on them in the profession of prostitution is not hidden from us. They are treated as a flaw to a society and thus exploited to any extent. Let’s take the example of Alisha, a Pakistani transgender who was shot dead by her boyfriend. Her friends say she was neglected by doctors and medical professionals who taunted her, rather than treating her. One of her friend Farzana, heading an organisation devoted to fighting for the rights of transgender people in Pakistan’s conservative north-west told that “First they sent her to male ward, but other patient and family members ordered her out. She was shunted then to the female ward, but she wasn’t welcome there either”. As outcasts, Pakistan’s transgender people are often forced into begging, dancing and even prostitution to earn money.  They also live in fear of attacks, causing most to either change their names or use only one name to give them anonymity in the society.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

As soon as their gender identity begins to unfold, the future of khawaja saras becomes shaky. Their childhoods are plagued with memories of aggressive relatives determined to shake them out of what they call their “feminine phase”.  However there is a small relief for the transgender people of Pakistan as of now since at least 50 clerics in Pakistan issued a fatwa , declaring marriage between transgender persons lawful. A transgender person having “visible signs of being a male” may marry a woman or a transgender person with “visible signs of being a female” and vice versa, the religious decree said. However, the fatwa added that a person with “visible signs of both genders” cannot marry anyone, Dawn reported.

As of India, the Center introduced the Transgender Person’s (Protection Of Rights) Bill, 2016, aiming to do away with the discrimination against transpersons and giving them the right to “self-perceived” gender identity, as reported by PTI. The Bill also mentions equipping every establishment with a grievance redressal process, to ensure protection from harassment and discrimination. Punishments will include a jail term ranging from six months to two years. A penalty to be imposed on those persons found guilty of forcing a transgender to bonded

Punishments will include a jail term ranging from six months to two years. A penalty to be imposed on those persons found guilty of forcing a transgender to bonded labour or begging, according to the Bill. This is a very positive step taken by the government to shed the insecurity of being a transgender person. It now, up to the society as to how they co-operate to the proposed law.

by Saptaparni Goon of NewsGram. Twitter: @saptaparni_goon

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

‘A Fantastic Woman’ Could Have Been Paramount in Portraying a Transgender Woman’s Struggle

"A Fantastic Woman" fails to carry us along in its protagonist's tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can't wait to get out of it.

0
Daniella Vega
'A fantastic Women' seems stretched out. Flickr

Film: “A Fantastic Woman” (Spanish, with English Subtitles, based on a transgender woman); Director: Sebastian Lelio; Starring: Daniela Vega; Rating: 1/2 (2 and a half stars)

“A Fantastic Woman” could have been penetrating portrait of a transgender woman’s struggle for dignity after her middle-aged lover suddenly dies on her.

Marina (played with consummate sensitivity by Daniela Vega) never quite recovers from the traumatic shock. Neither does the film. It quickly goes downhill from the point of tragedy, building what looks like a shell-shocked narrative in-sync with the stupor that falls over Daniela’s soul after Orlando (Francisco Reyes) passes away.

The ensuing trauma of a ‘woman’ who is unacceptable to society for her gender and status in the life of the man she loved, is brought out like a dentist extracting rotten teeth. It is a graceless situation.And director Sebastian Lelio goes with the frown, rendering every crease in Daniela’s disheveled existence in shades of black and fright.

Daniela Vega
Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, makes it seem unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose. Flickr

Daniela’s dilemma is so in-your-face, it hardly needed to be affirmed so strongly by the narrative. Her humiliation is shown in scenes in the hospital and at the police station. And we know what happens to the mistress specially when she is gender-challenged. But Marina’s behaviour post the tragedy eschews empathy. She frets, fumes, snarls and at one point even jumps on to the car of her deceased lover’s family to bounce up and down.

By this point the edgy narrative begins to look uneasily unfocused.

Perhaps Marina’s unconventional methods of protest are a cultural things. Maybe in Chile, the conventions of bereavement are played out at a pitch that seems fairly bizarre to us. Also, the fact that the film is in Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, such as the one where Marina is confronted by Orlando’s wife in a car basement, seems unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose.

Also Read: Eating diorder can be treated in transgenders

“A Fantastic Woman” fails to carry us along in its protagonist’s tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can’t wait to get out of it.

Neither can we. (IANS)