31 Years of Raja Sweets in US: How Indian Food Landed in Houston?

The restaurant was featured in American television show "Cooking in America", hosted by Sheldon Simeon, who visited the 31-year-old spot, now the cornerstone of the city’s “Little India” district

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Raja Sweets
Raja Sweets Restaurant in US. Wikimedia
  • Raja Sweets was the first Indian Restaurants to open in Houston back in 1986 by the Gahunia Family
  • Edibles at the restaurant are freshly made by hand from the scratch and are delectable to devour
  • The restaurant was featured in American television show “Cooking in America”

June 27, 2017: People come to another country for better live or work but you want to feel like home someday and Raja Sweets strive to give that feeling to its Indian customers. First assembled in India and then housed in the middle of Houston, Raja Sweets was the first Indian Restaurants to open back in 1986 by the Gahunia Family.

Joginderi Gahuniya is the founding father of Indian food in Houston.Today, Sharan Gahuniya is keeping her father’s legacy alive alongside her mother.

Sharan revived: “My dad’s motto was to bring the streets of India to Hillcroft (Street), we make food the way you find it in India.”

While in Houston, the Gahuniya family realised that there was no place to Indian get together restaurant. during Diwali or Ramadan.  

Edibles at Raja Sweets are made by hand from the scratch and are fresh to devour. From the rasgulla (chhena dough boiled in sweet syrup) to gulab jamun (milk balls dipped in rose syrup) to jalebi (deep-fried flour in syrup), Raja Sweets has it all to retreat their Indian customers. 

 Raja Sweets also has loyal customers, one of them pays a visit every single day from the past 12 years. Sharan’s father had the vision to be successful in America, having said that the family worked hard to make their dream come true. Raja Sweets is now the longest running restaurants in Texas.

The restaurant was featured in American television show “Cooking in America”, hosted by Sheldon Simeon, who visited the 31-year-old spot, now the cornerstone of the city’s “Little India” district.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter: @Nainamishr94