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This is how UK is going to use rivers to heat millions of homes

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

Soon British rivers will be heating millions of homes. England’s Energy Secretary Ed Davey is trying to promote water-source heat pumps; carbon-free devices that extract thermal energy from waterways to heat water for radiators and showers.

The technology is already in use in Scandinavian countries where heat from nearby rivers and canals is pumped into houses.

He has identified more than 4,000 rivers, estuaries, coastal sites and canals with water warm and accessible enough to heat more than a million homes in the vicinity, the Independent reported.

The technology is not only clean and renewable but cheap too. It will allegedly slash power bills of Brits by 20%.

‘We need to make the most of the vast amount of clean, renewable heat that lays dormant and unused in our rivers, lakes and seas’ the Independent quoted the Secretary.

The heating systems used in Britain will be more effective than the ones used in the Scandinavian countries. The new systems developed by scientists at Mitsubishi and Mike Spenser-Morris, a London property developer and director of the Zero Carbon Partnership can create 45C heat and cover a wider area.

The system requires a network of pipes running 2 meters below the surface of the water where the temperature is about 8C to 10C. These pipes are filled with a solution of water and anti-freeze which is heated by the warmer water outside the pipe and pumped into the house.

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

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Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)

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