Tuesday January 21, 2020
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Thousands flock to New Zealand for Diwali celebrations

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Wellington: Thousands of people flocked to Auckland on Sunday to get a first-hand experience of traditional-cum-contemporary Indian culture in a celebration of the Diwali festival, a media report said.

The two-day Diwali celebrations concluded at the Queen St’s Aotea Square with a fireworks finale on Sunday night and included events like workshops, live dance, music, puppet and theatre performances, New Zealand Herald reported.

The event is the largest vegetarian festival in the city and recorded a footfall of 35,000 people last year.

The event was organised by Auckland Council’s Tourism, Events and Economic Development arm in collaboration with the Asia New Zealand Foundation.

The celebrations were spiced up by the availability of traditional food while arts and crafts and dancing gave an insight into the multi-hued Indian culture.

The festival had more than 60 food and craft stalls — the largest in the festival’s 14-year history.

Many Indian performers, including Indian puppeteer and master storyteller Mahipat Kavi, and Mudra Creation — a Lavani folk dance group from Maharashtra, performed at the event.

Other highlights included a ‘bhangra’ (Punjab folk dance) performance by a group of policemen (and a woman). The dance was coordinated by New Zealand’s first Indian female police officer Mandeep Kaur.

Smita Upadhye, an India-born Auckland-based contemporary artist, supervised the colourful, geometric ‘rangoli’ patterns at the kids’ rangoli workshops.

“It is especially used during Diwali, because of a belief that goddess Lakshmi likes colourful decoration, and if you decorate your house with rangoli on Diwali, she will be pleased and come into the house,” she said.

Indian and Kiwi artists, Harpreet Singh and Brydee Rood, in collaboration have displayed their works at the Auckland Art Gallery in Kitchener.

The collaboration was aimed at reflecting Indian traditions and contemporary concerns about migration and refugees, and the cultural diversity of Auckland.

(IANS)

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Most Hated Task by Professionals in India is Data Entry: Report

88% Indians believe bots should be used for admin work

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India bots
Eighty-eight per cent of people in India believe that humans shouldn't be carrying out repetitive admin tasks if they can be done by bots. Pixabay

Eighty-eight per cent of people in India believe that humans shouldn’t be carrying out repetitive admin tasks if they can be automated and this could be a better way to make use of technology, a new report said on Tuesday.

The Automation Anywhere — a global leader in Robotic Process Automation (RPA) surveyed more than 10,000 office workers and revealed that on an average they spend more than three hours a day on manual, repetitive computer tasks which are not part of their primary job.

The research, conducted by OnePoll, investigated the time spent on and attitudes towards manual, repetitive digital administration tasks in the modern enterprise.

India bots
Workers in India can focus on higher value tasks if the mundane repetitive tasks can be automated and be completed by bots. Pixabay

“As per the report, the most hated task for Indian professionals is Data Entry. Close to 80 per cent of the participants in India believe that admin work is an obstacle for them to do their main job,” said Milan Sheth, Executive Vice President India, Middle East and Africa, Automation Anywhere.

“Workers can focus on higher value tasks if the mundane repetitive tasks can be automated,” Sheth added.

New data shows that nearly half of workers surveyed who expressed an opinion find digital administration boring (47 per cent) and a poor use of their skills (48 per cent), while the majority say it gets in the way of doing their main job (51 per cent overall, rising to 80 per cent in India) and reduces their overall productivity (64 per cent).

According to the survey, Over half (52 per cent) of millennial respondents felt that they could be more productive if they had less administrative tasks to complete, slightly higher than the average at 48 per cent.

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The study also revealed that nearly half (49 per cent) of those surveyed say that simple digital administrative tasks often prevent them from leaving the office on time, 60 per cent of the Indian participants believe the same, indicating it’s impacting their personal lives. (IANS)