Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
A medical assistant, right, provides paperwork to people in line at a walk-up COVID-19 testing site in Dallas, Texas, June 11, 2020. VOA

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said Monday the coronavirus pandemic is being politicized and that a lack of global leadership to fight the virus is a bigger threat than the virus itself.

“The world is in desperate need of national unity and global solidarity. The politicization of the pandemic has exacerbated it,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday during a videoconference for the Dubai-based World Government Summit.


Follow NewsGram on Facebook to stay updated.

“The greatest threat we face now is not the virus itself. It’s the lack of global solidarity and global leadership,” Tedros added.

Tedros did not say who he thought was politicizing the pandemic.

U.S. President Donald Trump has criticized the WHO for its response to the coronavirus outbreak, saying it acted too slowly and with too much praise for China. He has threatened to end all U.S. funding for the organization.


World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus wears a protective face mask after leaving a ceremony for the restarting of Geneva’s landmark fountain, following the COVID-19 outbreak, in Geneva, June 11, 2020. VOA

Tedros said Monday the world reported a jump of 183,000 new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Sunday, the largest single-day increase it has recorded since the pandemic began.

Global infections surpassed 9 million on Monday. Tedros noted that it took over three months for the world to see 1 million virus infections, but the last 1 million cases have come in just eight days.

Global cases of the virus have been surging in Brazil and India, while the United States is reporting new outbreaks.

Brazil’s health ministry said Monday the country recorded 21,432 new confirmed cases in the past 24 hours, along with 654 new deaths.

India also reported Monday a record number of cases and 400 new deaths in the past 24 hours.

More than a dozen U.S. states are seeing rising case numbers. In New York City, however, once the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, cases have leveled off. Monday marked an opening of more businesses in the city.


President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the BOK Center, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020. VOA

In Britain, the government reported its lowest daily COVID-19 death toll since mid-March with 15 new deaths.

New Zealand announced Monday it was tightening some coronavirus restrictions as it tries to stamp out an uptick in cases, all imported, after having declared it eliminated any active cases in the country.

The measures include extending a ban on cruise ships docking in New Zealand ports and stricter conditions to be met before those who arrive from overseas can leave quarantine.

New Zealand has reported nine new cases, including two more Monday, all of whom are currently in isolation facilities.

South Korea, which has been dealing with its own increase mainly in the Seoul area in recent weeks, reported 17 new cases Monday, the smallest rise in nearly a month.

The Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that across the content, the number of confirmed cases has passed the 300,000 mark. South Africa has the most with more than 101,000.


Diners enjoy lunch in outdoor seating at a Little Italy restaurant on the first day of the phase two re-opening of businesses in New York City, June 22, 2020. VOA

Also Read: Annual Rath Yatra of Lord Jagannath Begins in Odisha

In Pakistan, authorities allowed some trade with neighboring Afghanistan to restart Monday. Trucks carrying fruits, vegetables and other goods were able to cross the Ghulam Khan border.

Saudi Arabia said this year’s pilgrimage to Islam’s holy sites, including Mecca, will not be canceled but only “very limited numbers” of people will be allowed at the sites.

In Japan, there was good news for sports fans. The heads of the country’s professional baseball and football leagues said Monday that beginning June 10, games can be played with up to 5,000 fans in attendance. People will be required to wear masks and avoid shouting. (VOA)


Popular

File

Bangladesh over the years show that the state has failed in its duty to protect minorities

By- Salil Gewali

If humanity is hurt, God is hurt.

Religion without compassion might give way to hatred. Compassion with a "self-interest" motive is completely irreligious. But of late, some of the religions have departed from those basic human values. Love and compassion are for only those who follow their "specific" faith. Very sadly, the religions are up as trading commodities in the world of proselytization. Better preachers attract more followers. Of course, no issue if they are not vying for their religious "supremacy". But the ground reality is utterly different. The claim for exclusive supremacy has become the first commandment --- a real bone of contention among the existing religions. In the name of religion, we have polluted our minds. we have corrupted our souls. We have also gone so much astray that God must have now shut his gateway to heaven!

Keep Reading Show less
File

The Aruba villa has great interiors, an outdoor facility, amazing bedrooms, clean bathrooms and huge living space.

By- Your Service

Taking out time for family has become very difficult as people are pretty busy in daily life and find very little time to spend with their loved ones. Planning a family vacation is an excellent way through which the whole family can step away from their daily life and have fun. You can find many destinations for a family vacation, but there is no place that can beat Aruba.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Flickr

Milky Way galaxy as seen from Chitkul Valley

NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has for the first time spotted signs of a planet transiting a star outside of the Milky Way galaxy, opening up a new avenue to search for exoplanets at greater distances than ever before.

The possible exoplanet -- or planets outside of our Solar System -- candidate is located in the spiral galaxy Messier 51 (M51), also called the Whirlpool Galaxy because of its distinctive profile, NASA said in a statement.

Astronomers have, so far, found all other known exoplanets and exoplanet candidates in the Milky Way galaxy, almost all of them less than about 3,000 light-years from Earth.

An exoplanet in M51 would be about 28 million light-years away, meaning it would be thousands of times farther away than those in the Milky Way, NASA said.

"We are trying to open up a whole new arena for finding other worlds by searching for planet candidates at X-ray wavelengths, a strategy that makes it possible to discover them in other galaxies," said Rosanne Di Stefano of the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard and Smithsonian (CfA) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who led the study.

The findings are published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

The exoplanet candidate was spotted in a binary system called M51-ULS-1, located in M51. This binary system contains a black hole or neutron star orbiting a companion star with a mass about 20 times that of the Sun. The X-ray transit they found using Chandra data lasted about three hours, during which the X-ray emission decreased to zero.

Based on this and other information, the team estimates the exoplanet candidate in M51-ULS-1 would be roughly the size of Saturn and orbit the neutron star or black hole at about twice the distance of Saturn from the Sun.

The team looked for X-ray transits in three galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, using both Chandra and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. Their search covered 55 systems in M51, 64 systems in Messier 101 (the "Pinwheel" galaxy), and 119 systems in Messier 104 (the "Sombrero" galaxy).

However, more data would be needed to verify the interpretation as an extragalactic exoplanet. One challenge is that the planet candidate's large orbit means it would not cross in front of its binary partner again for about 70 years, thwarting any attempts for a confirming observation for decades, NASA said.

Named in honor of the late Indian-American Nobel laureate, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, the Chandra X-ray Observatory is the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. It has eight times greater resolution and is able to detect sources more than 20-times fainter than any previous X-ray telescope.

Known to the world as Chandra (which means "moon" or "luminous" in Sanskrit), Chandrasekhar was widely regarded as one of the foremost astrophysicists of the twentieth century. (IANS/JB)


Keep reading... Show less