Tuesday November 19, 2019

Three-Drug Combination Therapy Improves Survival in Patients with Advanced Bowel Cancer

The international study was a multi-institutional collaboration with over 200 centres worldwide

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cancer, vitamin A
Participants' hair colour, the number of severe sunburns they had received in their lifetime and any family history of skin cancer were also taken into account. Pixabay

A targeted three-drug combination therapy resulted in median overall survival of nine months for patients with advanced bowel cancer compared to 5.4 months for current standard-of-care treatment, showed the results of a phase-3 clinical trial.

The data suggested that the three-drug combination, encorafenib, binimetinib and cetuximab, should replace chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have a BRAF gene flaw. Metastatic cancer can spread from one organ to another.

BRAF mutations are estimated to occur in up to 15 per cent of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, with V600E being the most common BRAF mutation and representing a poor prognosis for these patients.

bowel cancer
The data suggested that the three-drug combination, encorafenib, binimetinib and cetuximab, should replace chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have a BRAF gene flaw. Pixabay

“This study builds on a decade of research into the tumour biology of BRAF-mutated colorectal cancer, and reflects a rationale combination to address the vulnerabilities unique to this tumour,” said principal investigator Scott Kopetz, Associate Professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in the US.

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“We are encouraged to see a meaningful improvement in outcomes with this new regimen for our patients,” Kopetz added. The international study was a multi-institutional collaboration with over 200 centres worldwide. The clinical trial involved 665 metastatic colorectal cancer patients with BRAF mutation. The findings were presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2019 in Barcelona, Spain. (IANS)

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Blood Cancer: Stem Cell Protein Play An Important Role in Cure

The stem cell protein Asrij is misexpressed in several human hematological malignancies and implicated in the p53 pathway and DNA damage response, the team said.

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cancer
According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53. VOA

Researchers have identified a stem cell protein that may help in finding cure for blood cancer.

The study, done on mice, suggests a stem cell protein called Asrij is a novel regulator of wild type tumour suppressor p53 stability in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

cancer
According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53. Pixabay

It could help design targeted therapies for myeloproliferative disease, a group of slow-growing blood cancers, according to researchers, including Maneesha S. Inamdar from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) in Bengaluru.

“We provide a new mouse model resembling myeloproliferative disease and identify a post-translational regulator of wild type p53 essential for maintaining HSC quiescence that could be a potential target for pharmacological intervention,” the team said.

According to the study, published in the journal Blood, inactivation of the tumour suppressor p53 is essential for unrestrained growth of cancers. But only 11 per cent of hematological malignancies have mutant p53.

microscope
The study, done on mice, suggests a stem cell protein called Asrij is a novel regulator of wild type tumour suppressor p53 stability in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pixabay

Mechanisms that cause wild type p53 dysfunction and promote leukemia are inadequately deciphered, suggests the study.

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The stem cell protein Asrij is misexpressed in several human hematological malignancies and implicated in the p53 pathway and DNA damage response, the team said.

For the study, the team generated the first Asrij null (knockout, KO) in mice and showed they are viable and fertile with no gross abnormalities. However, by six months, they exhibited increased peripheral blood cell counts, splenomegaly and an expansion of bone marrow HSCs with higher myeloid output. (IANS)