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Three Mistakes Women Make While Buying Heels

From buying unfit shoes to wearing heels for a long time are the few basic mistakes that ladies make while buying shoes, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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High heels can cause major joint problems: AIIMS expert. Pixabay

How long have you been wearing the same shoe size? It is important to realise that women’s feet are constantly changing due to factors such as ageing, weight gain or loss and pregnancy. Still there are a few mistakes that women make when buying that perfect pair.

From buying unfit shoes to wearing heels for a long time are the few basic mistakes that ladies make while buying shoes, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

* Mistake number one: Buying shoes that do not fit now.

Always buy shoes that fit you now. People constantly try on shoes (especially when the heels are in sales), think to themselves “they feel a little tight”, and then convince themselves “Well, they’ll stretch…”. Nine out of 10 times, they won’t, or at least not enough to make them really comfortable. Don’t buy a pair of heels with the hope that they’ll fit in the future. Also, the majority of us have one foot bigger than the other, so when buying shoes fit the shoe to your larger foot.

Representational image
Representational image. Pixabay

* Mistake number two: Buying heels in the morning.

Shop for heels towards the end of the day where possible. Our feet swell towards the end of the day and this will give you a truer fitting of the shoe by the end of the day. As well as being uncomfortable, no one wants a foot muffin top on a sexy pair of heels.

* Mistake number three: Wearing heels for way too long.

Also Read: Tips to Make High Heels Wearable

Wearing heels for a prolonged amount of time is not good for your feet, neither on a short nor long term basis. But let’s face it, every lady loves a good pair of heels to complete that perfect OOTD (outfit for the day). If you wear heels to work or on a night out, try to bring a comfortable pair of shoes along with you so you’re not having to wear them for a prolonged period of time. Once you’ve finished at work or your event is over, swap those heels for a comfy pair of shoes. (Bollywood Country)

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Sweetened Beverages May Increase Risk of Early Death: Study

Sugar-sweetened beverages intake is also on the rise in developing countries, spurred by urbanisation and beverage marketing

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The "soft drinks" were defined as caffeinated colas, caffeine-free colas and other carbonated beverages (such as diet ginger ale). Pixabay

Women who drink sugar sweetened beverages are at an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases, researchers have warned.

The study, led by Harvard University researchers, found that drinking 1-4 sugary drinks per month was linked with a one per cent increased risk of death and 2-6 drinks per week with a six per cent increase.

The increased early death risk linked with sugar-sweetened beverages consumption was more pronounced among women than among men, the findings, published in the journal Circulation, showed.

“Our results provide further support to limit intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and to replace them with other beverages, preferably water, to improve overall health and longevity,” said lead author Vasanti Malik.

However, drinking one artificially-sweetened beverage per day instead of carbonated and non-carbonated soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy drinks, and sports drinks lowered the risk of premature death.

One should go for healthier alternatives of cold drinks. Wikimedia Commons
One should go for healthier alternatives of cold drinks. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, the team analysed data from 80,647 women and 37,716 men.

The study supports policies to limit marketing of sugary beverages to children and adolescents and for implementing soda taxes.

Also Read- Strength Training Can Help in Reducing Fatty Liver Disease, Says Study

Sugar-sweetened beverages should be no more than 10 per cent of daily calories from added sugars.

Sugar-sweetened beverages intake is also on the rise in developing countries, spurred by urbanisation and beverage marketing, said the team. (IANS)