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Apple CEO Tim Cook Believes Four-year Degree Not Necessary for Coding

Cook believes that many businesses have still not adopted the technological advancements and are still using very old technologies but with more solutions from SAP and Apple

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during a data privacy conference at the European Parliament in Brussels. VOA

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes that a four-year degree is not really necessary to excel at coding and termed it an “old and traditional view”.

“I don’t think a four year degree is necessary to be proficient at coding. I think that’s an old, traditional view. What we found out is that if we can get coding in the early grades and have a progression of difficulty over the tenure of somebody’s high school years, by the time you graduate kids like Liam, as an example of this, they’re already writing apps that could be put on the App Store,” TechCrunch quoted Cook as saying on Friday.

Earlier this week, Cook visited Orlando, Florida and surprised a 16-year-old coder, Liam Rosenfeld, who is one of the 350 scholarship winners attending Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) next month in San Jose, California, MacRumors reported.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an event to announce new products, Oct. 30, 2018, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. VOA

While in Florida, Cook also attended a conference that saw SAP and Apple announce an expanded partnership focused on new enterprise apps taking advantage of technologies like Machine Learning (ML) and Augmented Reality (AR).

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Cook believes that many businesses have still not adopted the technological advancements and are still using very old technologies but with more solutions from SAP and Apple, and tech-savvy employees of the future like Rosenfeld, that could change, the report added. (IANS)

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Tech Giant Apple Pledges to Alert Users on iPhone Performance

Apple has agreed to do this both for current and future iPhones

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A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

Apple has committed to be clearer and more upfront with iPhone users about battery health and performance, the UK’s competition watchdog has said.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) had raised consumer law concerns with the Cupertino-based tech giant last year after finding people were not being warned clearly that their phone’s performance could slow down following a 2017 software update designed to manage demands on the battery.

“The CMA became concerned that people might have tried to repair their phone or replace it because they weren’t aware the software update had caused the handset to slow down,” the watchdog said in a statement on late Wednesday.

In addition, people were not able to easily find information about the health of their phone’s battery, which can degrade over time.

After the CMA raised its concerns, Apple started to be more up front with iPhone users.

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This Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, photo shows from left the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone XR in New York. The new XR phone has a larger display and loses the home button to make room for more screen. VOA

“But today’s announcement locks the firm into formal commitments always to notify people when issuing a planned software update if it is expected to materially change the impact of performance management on their phones,” the watchdog added.

Apple will also provide easily accessible information about battery health and unexpected shutdowns, along with guidance on how iPhone users can maximise the health of their phone’s battery.

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This could help people improve the performance of their own handset after a planned software update by, for example, changing settings, adopting the low power mode or replacing the battery – rather than resorting to having their phone repaired or replaced.

Apple has agreed to do this both for current and future iPhones. (IANS)