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Apple CEO Tim Cook Believes Four-year Degree Not Necessary for Coding

Cook believes that many businesses have still not adopted the technological advancements and are still using very old technologies but with more solutions from SAP and Apple

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during a data privacy conference at the European Parliament in Brussels. VOA

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes that a four-year degree is not really necessary to excel at coding and termed it an “old and traditional view”.

“I don’t think a four year degree is necessary to be proficient at coding. I think that’s an old, traditional view. What we found out is that if we can get coding in the early grades and have a progression of difficulty over the tenure of somebody’s high school years, by the time you graduate kids like Liam, as an example of this, they’re already writing apps that could be put on the App Store,” TechCrunch quoted Cook as saying on Friday.

Earlier this week, Cook visited Orlando, Florida and surprised a 16-year-old coder, Liam Rosenfeld, who is one of the 350 scholarship winners attending Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) next month in San Jose, California, MacRumors reported.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an event to announce new products, Oct. 30, 2018, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. VOA

While in Florida, Cook also attended a conference that saw SAP and Apple announce an expanded partnership focused on new enterprise apps taking advantage of technologies like Machine Learning (ML) and Augmented Reality (AR).

Also Read- Google Looking Forward to Work with India’s Anti-trust Watchdog

Cook believes that many businesses have still not adopted the technological advancements and are still using very old technologies but with more solutions from SAP and Apple, and tech-savvy employees of the future like Rosenfeld, that could change, the report added. (IANS)

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Apple Refutes Report of Sharing Safari Data with Tencent or Google

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is "ingrained in the Constitution," but that he's worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us

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Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

After media reports surfaced that Apple is sending iOS users’ data via its Safari browser to Google and the Chinese tech company Tencent, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker refuted such reports, saying it safeguards people’s information in its own systems and never shares it with third-party players.

A report in reclaimthenet.org stated that “Apple, which often positions itself as a champion of privacy and human rights, may be sending some IP addresses from users of its Safari browser on iOS to Chinese conglomerate Tencent — a company with close ties to the Chinese Communist Party”.

The report focused on Apple’s “fraudulent website warning” system which is built into Apple’s Safari web browser to warn people when they visit sites that are harmful and can trick users into sharing login passwords for banks, email and social media.

“Before visiting a website, Safari may send information calculated from the website address to Google Safe Browsing and Tencent Safe Browsing to check if the website is fraudulent. These browsing providers may also log your IP address,’ read the information on Apple’s “Safari & Privacy” section.

It’s unclear when Apple started allowing Tencent and Google to log some user IP addresses, but one Twitter user reported the change in Safari happened as early as the iOS 12.2 beta in February 2019, said the report.

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In a statement, the company said it actually doesn’t send information to Google or Tencent.

“Instead, it receives a list of bad websites from both companies and then uses it to protect people as they surf the web. Apple sometimes obscures the information about the website people visit if it requests more information to check if a questionable website is malicious,” CNET reported on Monday, citing Apple’s statement.

Also Read: Kerala Unable to get Medics from Reserved Category

For people concerned about their privacy, the service can be turned off in Safari preferences on the iPhone or Mac.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is “ingrained in the Constitution,” but that he’s worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us. (IANS)