Thursday August 16, 2018

Tip to Improve Memory: Start Acting Out Things That You Want to Remember!

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Tip to Improve Memory: Start acting out things that you want to remember!
Tip to Improve Memory: Start acting out things that you want to remember! Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
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Are you struggling with your ever increasing forgetful nature? Are you seeking tips to improve memory?  Of-late you have been feeling annoyed with yourself, maybe for forgetting to do an important task, or for leaving the house keys behind. If so, acting out things you are supposed to remember or pretending that you are actually doing it, can help you recall, suggests a research.

The findings showed that alternative enactment techniques, such as acting, can improve patients’ prospective memory — where you have not remembered to take the action you had planned.

This involves recreating an action one would like to remember, and pretending that you are actually doing it, in as much vivid detail as possible, the researchers said.

A failing prospective memory can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to lead author Antonina Periera, psychologist at the University of Chichester in the UK. 

Improve Memory, Boost memory, Start acting
Tip to Improve Memory: Start acting out things that you want to remember! Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

“The study suggests that enactment techniques are effective in improving prospective memory,” she added.

In the research, published in the journal Neuropsychology, the team examined the prospective memory performance in nearly 100 participants, which included patients with mild cognitive impairment aged 64-87 years, healthy older adults aged 62-84 years and younger adults aged 2-18 years.

Participants of all age groups reported improvement in prospective memory, especially the older subjects with mild cognitive impairment in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, after the enhancement technique.

The researchers confirmed that prospective memory erodes as we get older and that enactment techniques might support those with a poor prospective memory.

Encouraging people in this category to adopt enhancement as a means to enhance prospective memory could result in them leading independent, autonomous lives for longer.

The enactment techniques “can have very long lasting effects and work even for people with cognitive impairment. Acting is the key,” Periera noted. (IANS)

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Brain’s memory area might be associated with anxiety and depression

Addiction, for example, could be linked to deficits of approach motivation. Anxiety and depression on the other hand could be linked to avoidance behaviours

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Sleep spindles can help in memory retention. Pixabay
Brain's memory can be affected by Depression and Anxiety. Pixabay

An area of the brain, commonly linked with memory and dementia, could also yield important clues about a range of mental health illnesses including addiction, anxiety and depression, a study has found.

The area, known as hippocampus, is a seahorse-shaped structure located deep inside the brain. As part of the limbic system, it plays an important role in memory processing and spatial cognition, including how mammals learn to understand and navigate their environment. Hippocampus have been long known for its role in memory and dementia, especially in relation to Alzheimer’s disease. In Alzheimer’s patients for instance, this region is one of the first areas of the brain to suffer damage.

Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
Anxiety can cause avoidance behaviour. Pixabay

The study, published in the journal Current Biology, revealed that because hippocampus plays a role in basic motivational behaviour, it may also offer important insights into a range of mental health illnesses. Addiction, for example, could be linked to deficits of approach motivation. Anxiety and depression on the other hand could be linked to avoidance behaviours, all of which could manifest itself in this part of the brain, Ito said.

Also Read: Women with larger waistline are at higher risk of anxiety

“Some patients have lesions to certain areas of this part of the brain, so hopefully we can assess them to see what particular aspects of approach avoidance behaviour may or may not be impacted,” the researchers said. IANS