Tuesday March 31, 2020

Tips for Parents of a Child With Kidney Disease

Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Advice for Parents

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Chronic Kidney Disease
Here are a few tips for parents of a child with chronic kidney disease (CKD). IANS

Chronic Kidney Disease brings along frequent doctor visits, required change of diet, treatment, lifestyle modification which can be difficult for any patient; if it is a child, it can be all the more gruelling. Having a child diagnosed with chronic kidney disease can be life altering & challenging for parents.

Right from taking care of their diet, making them understand the disease and the subsequent treatment required, parents feel an immense sense of accountability to take care of their child in every and the best possible way. Here are a few tips for parents of a child with chronic kidney disease (CKD), shared by Umesh Khanna, Member Scientific Advisory Board, Medical Director, NephroPlus Mumbai.

Explain CKD in a fun way, easy for your child to understand

Chronic Kidney Disease
Chronic Kidney Disease brings along frequent doctor visits, required change of diet, treatment, lifestyle modification which can be difficult for any patient. Pixabay

It is very important for a parent to inform and educate their child about their diagnosis. You may use basic yet fun terms to explain to your child what CKD is & the reason they are undergoing certain tests and treatments. When your child knows what the instruments and machines are used for, it will help in easing their anxiety and will encourage positive participation. Refrain from explain more than your child can understand.

It is imperative that you make your child understand that the doctors, nurses, dialysis technicians, and dietitians all on his or her side and are there to help. They are collectively there to make them feel better and fight the disease, even if that means they have to do things that will cause some temporary pain or discomfort. Motivate your child to ask questions not only of you but of doctors, nurses and other health professionals.

Ensure you child is involved in his or her care as much as possible so that they will gradually develop a sense of responsibility.

1. Assist your child in understanding and accepting diet restrictions

Often, your child will be more compliant with dietary limitations than an adult will. Before meeting the dietitian, ask your child to make a list of their favourite foods. Allow them to talk to the dietitian to see if the foods on their list can be incorporated into the diet plan. Don’t force your child to eat something as this can often turn mealtime into an unpleasant experience.

2. Dealing with Low Self-esteem

Chronic Kidney Disease
To fight kidney disease in children, parents must ensure that the child is eating healthy. Pixabay

CKD not only brings physical distress to your child but can also have a psychological impact. It can make your child feel depressed and powerless. Learning and development issues may also stem from the situation further leading to low self-esteem. One way to help children is to make them feel empowered; give as much control and accountability over their own care as possible by:

Making them aware and learn more about their medicines, including doses

Encourage your child to take an active part in their treatments while on dialysis

Allow them to participate in treatment decision making, while guiding them

Also Read- Rejuvenate Your Skin This Spring by Following These Tips

3. Indulge in regular physical activities

Sometimes parents may feel protective of their sick child, but they should not try to limit their child’s physical activity unless instructed by a doctor. Indulging in a physical activity will help your child sweat which will get rid of excess fluid and flush out toxins through the skin. This will build confidence and reduce psychological distress. (IANS)

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Most Infants Consume Added Sugar: Study

Is your toddler consuming added sugar?

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infants sugar
A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume added sugars. Pixabay

Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of toddlers between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

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She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

infants sugar
Most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns. Pixabay

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

The findings showed that toddlers consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

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” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider.Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

infants sugar
Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets. Pixabay

The findings showed that infants consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Also Read- Night-Shift Workers More Prone To Get Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider. (IANS)