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http://holifestival.com

By Shahnaz Husain

Holi, the festival of colors, is celebrated at a time when nature renews and refreshes herself. With a little care, we can do the same and also sustain our youth and beauty.


The dry “Gulal” and the wet colors of today are not derived from natural sources. They contain chemicals, shiny particles of mica and even lead, which not only irritate the skin, but collect on the scalp.

Since Holi is played outdoors, sun-exposure can have a detrimental effect on the skin. Apart from harmful UV radiation, sun-exposure makes the skin dry by causing depletion of moisture and also tans the skin. The skin can become dry and dull after playing Holi.

Remember to apply a sunscreen 20 minutes before going out in the sun. Use a sunscreen of SPF 20 and above. If your skin is prone to pigmented patches, select a higher SPF. Most sunscreens have built-in moisturizers. If your skin is very dry, first apply the sunscreen, wait for a few minutes and then apply a moisturizer. Apply moisturizing lotion or cream on the arms and exposed areas.

Apply leave-on conditioner or hair serum on hair before playing Holi. This protects the hair from the effects of sun exposure and dryness caused by colors. Hair cream containing sunscreen is also available.

Take very little, spread on both palms and massage light into the hair, or smooth palms over the hair. Or, apply pure coconut oil and massage it lightly into the hair. This also provides protection against colors.

Apply transparent nail varnish on the nails. This helps to protect the nails from absorbing Holi colors.

The real problem is removal of colors after playing Holi. Rinse the face with plenty of plain water and then use a cleansing cream, or lotion. Apply and massage it on the face. Then wipe off with moist cotton wool. Remember to cleanse the area around the eyes too, using a light touch. A cleansing gel helps to dissolve the colors and facilitates their removal.

To make your own cleanser, take half a cup of cold milk and add one teaspoon of any vegetable oil, like “til,” olive or sunflower oil. Mix well. Dip cotton wool into this mixture and use it to cleanse the skin.

Sesame seed (til) oil can be used to remove colors from the body, massaging it on the skin. This not only helps to remove the colors, but gives added protection to the skin. Sesame seed (til) oil actually helps to counteract sun-damage.

While bathing, scrub the body gently with a loofah or wash cloth. Immediately after your bath, apply a moisturizer on the face and body, while the skin is still damp. This helps to seal in moisture.

If there is itching, add two tablespoons vinegar to a mug of water and use it as a last rinse. This helps to reduce itching. However, if the itching continues, and there is rash and redness, there may be an allergic reaction to the color. Consult a doctor as soon as possible.

While washing the hair, first rinse with plenty of plain water to wash away the dry colors and tiny particles of mica. Then apply a mild herbal shampoo, working it into the hair with the fingers. Massage the scalp gently and rinse thoroughly with water again.

Beer can be used as a last rinse. In fact, it will soften and condition the hair. Add the juice of a lemon to the beer. Pour over the hair after shampoo. Leave on for a few minutes and rinse off with plain water.

The day after Holi, mix two tablespoons honey with half a cup of curd. Add a pinch of turmeric. Apply this on the face, neck and arms. Leave it on for 20 minutes and wash off with water. Helps to remove tan and soften the skin.

Within the next few days, give your hair a nourishing treatment. Mix one tablespoon pure coconut oil with one teaspoon castor oil. Heat and apply on the hair. Then dip a towel in hot water, squeeze out the water and wrap the hot towel around the head, like a turban. Keep it on for 5 minutes. Repeat the hot towel wrap 3 or 4 times. This helps the hair and scalp absorb the oil better. Wash your hair after an hour. (IANS)

Shahnaz Husain is a well-known beauty expert, specializing in herbal remedies.


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IANS

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