Tuesday January 21, 2020

Tips That Can Help in Boost Healthy Living

Five easy-to-find foods to boost your health:

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Tips That Can Help in Boost Healthy Living
Stay healthy with dried fruits, health bars. Pixabay

Get your diet chart right for a healthier and happier you.

Faith Toogood, a nutritionist working with Spire Bristol Hospital here, has suggested tips on foods that can help in boost healthy living, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

Five foods to give up:

* Sugar: The sweet stuff is enemy number one when it comes to losing weight. Recent studies have suggested that our excessive consumption of sugar is contributing to the obesity epidemic – on average we’re eating about twice as much sugar as we should be. Try to opt for low sugar alternatives and get in the habit of reading the labels of the foods you buy – and if sugar is listed in the first three ingredients then don’t buy it.

* Trans-fats: A trans-fat is a form of unsaturated fat which behaves like a saturated fat because of its chemical structure. It should be avoided as trans-fats increase the levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol in your blood, while also lowering the amount of ‘good’ cholesterol in the blood.

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Avoid the intake of processed meat in your diet. Pixabay

* Processed meats: A processed meat isn’t just spam, which is what initially springs to mind. The definition includes any meat that has had something done to it to make it last longer (through salting, curing, smoking or using chemical preservatives) which includes lunch meats such as Parma ham and bacon.

* Ready meals: They’ve been on the bad list for a while, but ready meals are often laden with a large amount of salt and sugar and are highly processed. Popular choices such as lasagne, moussaka and curry are some of the worst culprits as they can contain large amounts of saturated fat.

Also Read: Dark Chocolate Your Key to Healthy Heart

Five easy-to-find foods to boost your health:

* Nuts: Nuts are packed with protein, fibre and essential fats, which makes them a very healthy snack. Just a handful of nuts contain a variety of vitamins and minerals – from vitamin E to help your skin to zinc which aids fertility. The best choices include almonds, brazil nuts, cashews and walnuts.

* Oats: Oats have long been associated with a healthy lifestyle and for good reason. Wholegrain oats are a good source of carbohydrate, magnesium and have a low glycemic index, which means they release energy into the blood stream slowly.

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Kale. Pixabay

* Kale: This leafy green has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity and rightly so. It’s extremely nutritious, widely available and cheap so there’s no excuse not to give it a try. Kale is very low fat and low in calories and it’s also a good source of dietary fibre, iron and calcium.

* Oily fish: There is some evidence that oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines help protect against cardiovascular disease, prostate cancer, age-related vision loss and dementia. Eating two portions of fish a week, with at least one of these being an oily fish, can help maintain a healthy blood pressure and reduce risk of heart disease.

* Pulses and beans: Pulses include foods such as beans, lentils and chickpeas – they’re a great low-fat source of protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals such as iron which makes them an excellent addition to a healthy diet. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Kids Who Watch Cooking Show Featuring Healthy Food Likely To Make Healthy Food Choice

Exposure to healthier options has on children is strongly influenced by personality traits

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Researchers believe that watching programmes with healthier options can still have a positive impact on children's behaviour, even if it is delayed by age, leading to consumption of healthy food. Pixabay

While exposure to television advertisements about fast foods is often linked to unhealthy eating habits among children, a new research has revealed that TV programmes featuring healthy food can influence children to make healthier food choices now and in adulthood.

Kids who watched a child-oriented cooking show featuring healthy food were 2.7 times more likely to make a healthy food choice than those who watched a different episode of the same show featuring unhealthy food, said the study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour.

“The findings from this study indicate cooking programmes can be a promising tool for promoting positive changes in children’s food-related preferences, attitudes, and behaviours,” said lead author Frans Folkvord of Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

For the study, the researchers asked 125 children between 10 to 12 years of age at five schools in the Netherlands to watch 10 minutes of a Dutch public television cooking programme designed for children, and then offered them a snack as a reward for participating.

Children who watched the healthy programme were far more likely to choose one of the healthy snack options — an apple or a few pieces of cucumber — than one of the unhealthy options — a handful of chips or a handful of salted mini-pretzels.

Prior research has found youth are more likely to eat nutrient-rich foods including fruits and vegetables if they were involved in preparing the dish, but modern reliance on ready-prepared foods and a lack of modelling by parents in preparing fresh foods have led to a drop in cooking skills among kids.

“Providing nutritional education in school environments instead may have an important positive influence on the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviours of children,” Folkvord said.

This study suggests the visual prominence of healthier options in both food choice and portion size on TV cooking programmes leads young viewers to crave those healthier choices then act on those cravings. But the effect that exposure to healthier options has on children is strongly influenced by personality traits.

Food
While exposure to television advertisements about fast foods is often linked to unhealthy eating habits among children, a new research has revealed that TV programmes featuring healthy food can influence children to make healthier food choices now and in adulthood. Pixabay

For example, children who don’t like new foods are less likely to show a stronger desire for healthier choices after watching a TV programme featuring healthier foods than a child who does enjoy trying new foods. As they grow older, though, they start to feel more responsible for their eating habits and can fall back on information they learned as children.

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Researchers believe this may indicate watching programmes with healthier options can still have a positive impact on children’s behaviour, even if it is delayed by age. (IANS)