Saturday September 21, 2019

Follow These Tips to Quit Smoking, Drinking

“Live Well To 101”, a wellness guide by doctor and television presenter Dawn Harper, lists useful tips to quit smoking:

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Hookah smoking is addictive and can lead to the use of other tobacco products such as cigarettes. Pixabay

Most lifestyle advice tells you to give that glass of wine or cigarette a miss. Serving as a reminder, a new book on healthy living reiterates the advice we know too well, topped off with practical tips that finally help you say ‘No.

“Live Well To 101”, a wellness guide by doctor and television presenter Dawn Harper, lists useful tips to quit smoking:

* Cigarettes don’t contain just nicotine but a range of toxic, carcinogenic chemicals you wouldn’t want near your body. Next time you reach for a cigarette that looks quite appealing, imagine yourself licking tarmac, chewing on rubber cement or drinking a cocktail of battery acid, lighter fuel and nail varnish remover.

* If you get the opportunity to talk to a smoker who has developed diseases as a result of smoking, knowing their stories might help put off your habit.

* To quit, go public! Telling everyone will keep you motivated. Also put aside cigarette money for something special, like a personal reward or charity.

* It’s easier never to start than it is to quit. Spread the message.

Representational image.

For alcohol, Dr Harper says:

* Don’t wait for warning signs. They may not come. Be honest with yourself about your consumption and start putting in dry days in your diary.

* Recognise your triggers and work on them. For instance, if you reach for the bottle when your kids are asleep, find ways to keep yourself occupied and not be tempted.

* Offer to drive when you go out — it gives you the perfect excuse to not drink.

Also Read- Does IVF Raise Risk of Cancer in Children? Find it out Here

* Understand your alcohol intake. Beers and wines have become stronger over the years so you may be taking in more units than you should, as well as more calories.

The 280-page book is published by Hachette India and is priced at Rs 399. (IANS)

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Usage of E-cigarettes Doubled Among US Kids in Two Years

Researchers have found that the number of kids vaping nicotine in the US has doubled in the past two years

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pushing to enact a statewide ban on the sale of flavored e-cigarettes amid growing health concerns connected to vaping. Pixabay

Researchers have found that the number of kids vaping nicotine/ e-cigarettes in the US has doubled in the past two years.

Data from the 2019 Monitoring the Future Survey that included children in Classes 8, 10 and 12, shows alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use compared to just a year ago, with rates doubling in the past two years, according to the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Parents with school-aged children should begin paying close attention to these devices, which can look like simple flash drives, and frequently come in flavours that are appealing to youth,” said study lead researcher Richard Miech from the University of Michigan in the US.

“National leaders can assist parents by stepping up and implementing policies and programs to prevent use of these products by teens,” Miech said.

e-cigarettes, nicotine, us, kids, smoking
National leaders can assist parents by stepping up and implementing policies and programs to prevent use of these products by teens. Pixabay

The new data shows a significant increase in vaping of nicotine in the past month in each of the three grade levels since 2018.

In 2019, the prevalence of past month nicotine vaping was more than one in four students in Class 12, one in five in Class 10 and one in 11 in Class 8.

ALSO READ: Quit Alcohol For Improved Mental Health, Say Researchers

“With 25 per cent of 12th graders, 20 per cent of 10th graders and nine per cent of 8th graders now vaping nicotine within the past month, the use of these devices has become a public health crisis,” said Nora D. Volkow from National Institute on Drug Abuse in US.

“These products introduce the highly addictive chemical nicotine to these young people and their developing brains, and I fear we are only beginning to learn the possible health risks and outcomes for youth,” Volkow added. (IANS)