Friday December 6, 2019
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To eat or not to eat? Think before you eat food items from these brands

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By Rukma Singh

With the beloved Maggi being taken off the shelves all over India, one would expect a strengthening of the approach towards food safety and security.

But as it turns out, the laxity in the attitude of the authority continues. The cases of food adulteration have been increasing by the day.

However, one positive aspect of the whole Maggi controversy has been the fact that the media has become more open to creating awareness about these issues.

Looks like the line between edible and inedible has become entirely blurred. NewsGram brings you a list of five food items that prove the same!

Live weevils found in Nestle Cerelac

After the recent controversy over Nestle’s ‘Maggi’ noodles, the company found itself deeper in trouble after live weevils and larvae were found in a cereal product meant for infants. The incident happened in Tamil Nadu when a lady opened a new packet of the cereal, only to throw it in the trash.

Detergent found in Mother Dairy milk sample

Detergent Found in Milk Sample, Says UP Food Administration

The UP Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday that it has found detergent in one of the samples of milk picked from Mother Dairy’s collection centres. Mother Dairy, however, has categorically denied any adulteration of milk it supplies in pouches.

Haldiram’s products rejected by the US Food and Drug Administration

According to a Wall Street Journal report, US FDA rejected Haldiram’s products because they “vary from problems in packaging and labeling to alleged contamination.” The FDA website says Indian products have been found to contain high levels of pesticides, mold and the bacteria salmonella.

Starbucks India syrups rejected by authorities

Starbucks India is going to stop using some of the signature syrups it uses in drinks in India after food-safety inspectors rejected many of its standard flavorings on account of ‘risks’. Among the rejects were classic coffee add-ons and favourites like caramel sauce and hazelnut syrup as well as lesser-known ingredients like cheese-flavored syrup and Panna Cotta Pudding.

Faeces found in Delhi street food

A latest study has found high faecal contamination in such fast food and junk food items (such as Samosas & Momos), especially in several west and central Delhi localities. The bacterial pathogens commonly found in street eateries are Bacillus cereus (causes vomiting and diarrhoea), Clostridium perfringens (abdominal cramps and diarrhoea), Staphylococcus aureus (vomiting, appetite loss, abdominal cramps and mild fever) and Salmonella species (typhoid, food poisoning, irritation and inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract).

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Foodies Must Try These Dishes from the Streets of Kolkata

Here are 5 must try dishes from the streets of Kolkata

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Foodies Kolkata
Here are the dishes from the streets of Kolkata that foodies would not want to miss. Wikimedia Commons

BY PUJA GUPTA

When you think about Bengali food, you will have a veritable carnival of sweet treats and seafood dishes parading through your mind. While roaming the streets of Kolkata, you will drool at all the delicacies; thats the Kolkata street food scene for you. Every true Bengali food lover has their recommendations or will suggest some must-try street food. But there are a few places which foodies agree you have to try!

Chef Ananya Banerjee, the owner of LAB studio, who hails from West Bengal, lists the top five must-try food items from the streets of Kolkata:

(1) Kathi-roll:The Kathi-roll of Bengal is a famous Mughlai influenced dish. The dish comprises of mutton and chicken rolls, spiced with fresh lemon juice, finely chopped green chilies, red onions and salt and is served as a roll in an egg paratha. Simply mouth-watering!

(2) Jhal Muri: This Bengali take on Chaat, distinguishes itself with the use of mustard oil or paste. This pungent treat is a must-have for a tete-a-tete over tea!

(3) Kobiraji Cutlet: “Kobiraji”, is a juicy cutlet, usually made with prawn coated with a lacy fried egg on outside. “When I was young, I remember going down to the Shyam Bazar- crossing for evening walks with my grandfather. After our walk, we would regularly eat prawn- Kobiraji from a food stall called Allen’s Kitchen. This tiny place has been serving the delicacy for more than 80 years,” says Banerjee.

Jhal muri
Jhal Muri is a Bengali chat that is loved by all foodies. Wikimedia Commons

(4) Moghlai Porota: This is surely not for the faint-hearted! It’s a flaky, crispy porota (parantha) stuffed with mutton mince and eggs. Have one and it will keep your tummy full for the rest of the day! The Anadi-Cabin, a restaurant on Dharmatala streets in Kolkata, is one of the pioneers in making “Mughlai-porota”.

Also Read- The Best Destinations for a Perfect Travel Experience

(5) Macher Chop: Among the many influences that the British gave us in their 200-year reign, the “chop” preparation is very popular. You go anywhere in the world, the word “chop” usually means “cut-of-a-meat”. However, in Bengal, it typically means fish, meat or vegetables, crumb-fried. You will typically get a whiff of that appetizing aroma, from the local roadside snack counters every evening around 5 pm.

It’s barely a preface into the sheer delights Bengali cuisine has to offer, but this must-try is enough to get you hooked! (IANS)