Tuesday December 18, 2018
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To eat or not to eat? Think before you eat food items from these brands

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By Rukma Singh

With the beloved Maggi being taken off the shelves all over India, one would expect a strengthening of the approach towards food safety and security.

But as it turns out, the laxity in the attitude of the authority continues. The cases of food adulteration have been increasing by the day.

However, one positive aspect of the whole Maggi controversy has been the fact that the media has become more open to creating awareness about these issues.

Looks like the line between edible and inedible has become entirely blurred. NewsGram brings you a list of five food items that prove the same!

Live weevils found in Nestle Cerelac

After the recent controversy over Nestle’s ‘Maggi’ noodles, the company found itself deeper in trouble after live weevils and larvae were found in a cereal product meant for infants. The incident happened in Tamil Nadu when a lady opened a new packet of the cereal, only to throw it in the trash.

Detergent found in Mother Dairy milk sample

Detergent Found in Milk Sample, Says UP Food Administration

The UP Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday that it has found detergent in one of the samples of milk picked from Mother Dairy’s collection centres. Mother Dairy, however, has categorically denied any adulteration of milk it supplies in pouches.

Haldiram’s products rejected by the US Food and Drug Administration

According to a Wall Street Journal report, US FDA rejected Haldiram’s products because they “vary from problems in packaging and labeling to alleged contamination.” The FDA website says Indian products have been found to contain high levels of pesticides, mold and the bacteria salmonella.

Starbucks India syrups rejected by authorities

Starbucks India is going to stop using some of the signature syrups it uses in drinks in India after food-safety inspectors rejected many of its standard flavorings on account of ‘risks’. Among the rejects were classic coffee add-ons and favourites like caramel sauce and hazelnut syrup as well as lesser-known ingredients like cheese-flavored syrup and Panna Cotta Pudding.

Faeces found in Delhi street food

A latest study has found high faecal contamination in such fast food and junk food items (such as Samosas & Momos), especially in several west and central Delhi localities. The bacterial pathogens commonly found in street eateries are Bacillus cereus (causes vomiting and diarrhoea), Clostridium perfringens (abdominal cramps and diarrhoea), Staphylococcus aureus (vomiting, appetite loss, abdominal cramps and mild fever) and Salmonella species (typhoid, food poisoning, irritation and inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract).

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Biggest Ocean Polluters Named to be Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Nestle: Study

Eighty per cent of the 8.3 billion metric tonnes of plastic produced since 1950 was still present in the environment, mainly in the oceans.

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Ocean , Wikimedia

Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nestle are among the companies that contribute most to ocean pollution with single-use plastics, according to a study presented on Tuesday by the “Break Free from Plastic” initiative.

The environmental movement, launched in 2016, has helped clear the coasts of 42 countries around the world of discarded plastics.

“These brand audits offer undeniable proof of the role that corporations play in perpetuating the global plastic pollution crisis,” said Von Hernandez, the Global Coordinator of Break Free From Plastic, at the presentation of the study in Manila.

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Plastic pollution, Pixabay

Between September 9 and 15, over 10,000 volunteers carried out 239 plastic cleaning actions on coasts and other natural environments in 42 countries, Efe news reported.

They collected more than 187,000 pieces of plastic, of which more than 65 per cent were from products by Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nestle. But companies such as Danone, Mondelez, Procter & Gamble, and Unilever, among others, were also mentioned in the report.

“The companies have a choice to make. They can be part of the problem or they can be part of the solution”, Hernandez told Efe.

“If they continue the use of problematic and unnecessary plastic packaging they are just encouraging more production and more pollution”.

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Coca Cola is known to spend a huge amount of money on its advertisement campaigns. Wikimedia Common

Around 100,000 pieces of plastic collected were made of materials like polystyrene, PVC (polyvinyl chloride), PET (polyethylene terephthalate) or the film of single-use plastic that were not biodegradable, the report said.

Plastic production has reached 320 million metric tonnes per year and is expected to grow by 40 per cent over the next decade, which will exponentially increase the release of greenhouse gases. Ninety per cent of plastics are produced from fossil fuels and pollutants.

“We must act now to demand that corporate brands reject their overpackaging habit in order to meaningfully reverse the demand for new plastic,” said Hernandez.

The study said that these large corporations must take responsibility for polluting the environment, as production of plastics exposes harmful substances to communities living near factories and pollutes foods and products contained in plastic wraps.

Also Read: Use Every Resources To Help in Climate Change: Scientists

Eighty per cent of the 8.3 billion metric tonnes of plastic produced since 1950 was still present in the environment, mainly in the oceans, according to studies cited in the “Break Free From Plastic” report.

Since then, only 9 per cent of that plastic had been properly recycled and 12 per cent incinerated. (IANS)