Tuesday January 16, 2018

Beware! Tobacco, Poor Diet, and Mental Disorders are Leading Causes of Poor Health and you may be at Risk too!

According to a new study, deaths from noncommunicable, or chronic, diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes have caused 72 percent of all deaths worldwide

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A heavyset man rests on a bench in Jackson, Miss. (VOA)
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London, September 15, 2017 : Heart disease and tobacco ranked with conflict and violence among the world’s leading cause of poor health and the biggest killers in 2016, while poor diets and mental disorders caused people the greatest poor health, a large international study has found.

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, published in The Lancet medical journal, found that while life expectancy is increasing, so too are the years people live in poor health. The proportion of life spent being ill is higher in poor countries than in wealthy ones.

ALSO READ World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates suggest 300 Million people suffer from Depression

“Death is a powerful motivator, both for individuals and for countries, to address diseases that have been killing us at high rates. But we’ve been much less motivated to address issues leading to illnesses,” said Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, which led the study.

He said a “triad of troubles” — obesity, conflict and mental illness — is emerging as a “stubborn and persistent barrier to active and vigorous lifestyles.”

Diet critical

The IHME-led study, involving more than 2,500 researchers in about 130 countries, found that in 2016, poor diet was associated with nearly one in five deaths worldwide. Tobacco smoking killed 7.1 million people.

ALSO READ Ban on E-Cigarettes May Increase the Risk on the Public Health in India, Warn Experts

Diets low in whole grains, fruit, nuts and seeds, fish oils and high in salt were the most common risk factors, contributing to cases of obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high cholesterol.

The study found that deaths from firearms, conflict and terrorism have increased globally, and that noncommunicable, or chronic, diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes caused 72 percent of all deaths worldwide.

Heart disease was the leading cause of premature death in most regions and killed 9.48 million people globally in 2016.

ALSO READ Eat According to Your Blood Type and See the Benefits Yourself!

Mental illness was found to take a heavy toll on individuals and societies, with 1.1 billion people living with psychological or psychiatric disorders and substance abuse problems in 2016.

Major depressive disorders ranked in the top 10 causes of ill health in all but four countries worldwide.

The GBD is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation global health charity and gives data estimates on 330 diseases, causes of death and injuries in 195 countries and territories. (VOA)

 

 

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How weight loss surgery will decrease heart disease risk

A study conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline

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Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay
Bariatric surgery decreases heart disease risk. Pixabay

Obesity can result in heart disease risk, everyone is aware of it. However, these is new way to maintain the health of your heart. Weight loss surgery can decrease the risk of heart disease, a study says.

“This is the first large-scale analysis of predictors of change in cardiovascular disease risk factors among adolescents following bariatric surgery,” said Marc P Michalsky, Professor at the Ohio State University College in the US.

Also read: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

Findings

Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Pixabay
  • Bariatric or weight-loss surgery performed during adolescence may provide unique benefits.
  • It minimizes the development and progression of impaired glucose metabolism, atherosclerosis heart failure and stroke.
  • Prior to the bariatric surgery, 33% of the participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors.
  • Three years post-surgery, only 5% of the study participants had three or more risk factors; representing significant reduction in the overall likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease later in life.
  • Not only weight loss, the surgery also reduced dyslipidemia risk among teenager — a condition marked by an abnormally increased level of cholesterol in the blood, when compared to the older people.

Methodology

  • The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline.
  • Among 242 participants of the study, 161 underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure, 67 of them underwent a vertical sleeve gastrectomy and 14, adjustable gastric banding.
  • The authors collected data from five participating medical centers for their observational study, and decisions about procedures depended on each center’s clinical practices.
  • The participants had a BMI between 34 to 88 when the study began. A BMI over 25 is considered overweight; over 30 is obese.

You may also like: Worried About Your Heart’s Health? Make These 5 Spices a Part of Your Diet and See the Benefits Yourself!

The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay
The study was conducted on 242 adolescents who were diagnosed with hearth risk factors at the baseline. Pixabay

Conclusion

  • The obesity classification with the highest risks of health problems is a BMI of 40 or higher. Three years after surgery, teens who underwent a gastric bypass had a 27 percent drop in their BMI, similar to the 26 percent drop in those who had the sleeve gastrectomy. Those with the gastric band had an 8 percent drop in BMI.

“The study demonstrated early improvement and reduction of cardio-metabolic risk factors, offering compelling support for bariatric surgery in adolescents,” Michalsky added.

The study was published in the online journal Pediatrics. (IANS)