Tuesday April 23, 2019

Tobacco Vendors Eye Schools For Sale, Says Study

It also stated that vendors display tobacco products in ways that are appealing to children and youth and utilize sales techniques such as discounting products and distributing free samples

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the world's leading killers
Tobacco vendors eye schools for sale: Study. Pixabay

Tobacco companies in India are targeting schoolchildren as young as eight years for sale of their products and placing advertisements, finds a new study.

Conducted by Consumer Voice and Voluntary Health Association (VHA) of India the study titled ‘India Tiny Targets Report’ which was released here on Wednesday, found that nearly half of the vendors around schools sell tobacco products.

It covered schools in 20 cities across six states — Delhi, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Assam, Tamil Nadu and Telangana.

For the study, survey was carried out in 243 schools at 487 point of sales (PoSs) across India has found that about half of them (225) sell tobacco products to minors.

FILE – Cigarette packs are seen on shelves in a tobacco shop in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France.

“Street vendors were the most common form of vendors of the 225 tobacco points of sale. Vendors advertise tobacco products around schools and sell cigarettes and bidis via single sticks, making these products cheap and accessible to children and youth,” the study found.

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It also stated that vendors display tobacco products in ways that are appealing to children and youth and utilize sales techniques such as discounting products and distributing free samples.

“The tobacco industry must be held accountable for their aggressive advertising efforts around our children’s schools. Our schools are not safe so long as the tobacco industry continues to try and lure our children into buying their deadly products,” Bhavna B Mukhopadhyay, Chief Executive, Voluntary Health Association of India said. (IANS)

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Researchers Probing if Tobacco’s Native Forms Less Harmful

“By working with the people who are disproportionately harmed by smoking, we can move on to co-design and testing of indigenous-centric solutions to reduce smoking harm.”

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hookah, cigarette, smoke
Hookah smoking is addictive and can lead to the use of other tobacco products such as cigarettes. Pixabay

Can indigenous ways of smoking counteract the harm being done by mass-produced cigarettes? Researching the roots of native Fijian tobacco plant ‘suki’ said to originated in Tamil Nadu and smoked in a “roll-up”, a renowned scientist from New Zealand is finding about the similar Indian cheroot.

On her visit to India, scientist Marewa Glover is accompanied by Fijian elder Setariki, who recalls learning that indentured labourers from India took tobacco plants with them to the South Pacific island country.

Looked at now, the Fijian suki appears to be processed similarly to cheroots found in Tamil Nadu’s Dindigul district.

Their visit was to see how similar the production process is for cheroot and ‘suki’ and to explore how people are using the cheroot today.

government information
FILE – Dr. Garen Wintemute, an emergency room physician at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, poses at the hospital in Sacramento, Calif., March 9, 2017. Wintemute, who has researched gun violence and firearms industry, worked with colleagues to download public records from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and other federal agencies after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. He and others feared the information might disappear from federal websites. VOA

“In India, mass-produced cigarettes made by tobacco companies have largely displaced cheroot use which is now viewed as an old and fading practice, as is the experience in Fiji,” Glover said in a statement.

“But as taxes on tobacco have been raised, native and Indian Fijians are turning back to growing, chewing and smoking suki,” the researcher, who is seeking to understand indigenous people’s use of tobacco in order to inform the reduction of disease associated with tobacco use, added.

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“The epidemic of tobacco-related diseases that cause about 7 million deaths around the world each year are mainly due to smoking the mass-produced cigarettes. Whilst smoking anything is damaging, prior to mass marketed cigarettes of tobacco companies, tobacco was harder to get and smoke and its use was often restricted using cultural rules,” she notes.

“By working with the people who are disproportionately harmed by smoking, we can move on to co-design and testing of indigenous-centric solutions to reduce smoking harm.” (IANS)