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Tomar admits forgery after a week of being in custody

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

After a week of getting arrested for submitting fake academic records, Former Delhi Law Minister, Jitender Singh Tomar finally confessed to his act of forgery. He admitted that he had bought the degrees from two agents.

According to an English newspaper, during the questioning, he was forced to reveal that he had procured his B.Sc. and LLB degrees from two different agents in Delhi and Munger respectively. His LLB degree was drawn from Tilka Manjhi Bhagalpur University, Bihar with the help of an agent named, Vinod while his B.Sc degree was hauled in the year 2001 from Awadh University, UP with the help of Madan.delhi-law-minister-jitender-singh-tomar-should-be-sacked-congress

In addition, Tomar also revealed that he was introduced to Vinod by his brother PS Tomar, who was a practising advocate. Also, Madan, who runs a private school in Shakarpur, was Tomar’s neighbour. In his defence, he further said that he did this only to be socially accepted. Being active in politics, he wanted to develop a career in politics for which he needed the degrees, according to a report in Hindustan Times.

Subsequently, Tomar’s remand has been extended by four days and he will now be interrogated on the network of agents he approached to buy the degrees. Police said, he will be questioned about the fake migration certificate too and a proper investigation will be conducted in the matter. They believe that extending Tomar’s days in custody will give them proper opportunity to probe further into the case.

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Big Business and Politics Mass-Mining Everyday Data from Facebook Likes to Online Subscriptions

There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think

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FILE - The Netflix logo is seen on their office in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. VOA

Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released on Wednesday.

“The Great Hack” says personal data has surpassed oil as the world’s most valuable asset, and warns viewers that companies and governments are hacking into way more than computers.

“There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think. If you don’t understand how you think, they will think for you,” said directors Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim. “It’s not just our computers that have been hacked, it’s our minds,” they said in a statement.

The two-hour documentary — showing on the Netflix streaming video platform — examines the state of privacy in the United States and Europe, where people spend much of their time online, volunteering countless nuggets of exploitable information.

Business, Politics, Data
Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released. Pixabay

It centers on the Cambridge Analytica affair, which saw an international consultancy target undecided voters in the Brexit referendum and 2016 U.S. election, partly using Facebook data.

Facebook Inc agreed on Wednesday to pay a $100 million fine to settle charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it misled investors about the misuse of its users’ data related to Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook did not admit or deny wrongdoing in agreeing to settle.

“Social media companies harvest millions of people’s personal data and sell it to the highest bidder. Personal data is being used on a mass scale to manipulate and influence people,” said Silkie Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, a British civil liberties group.

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“Data-driven manipulation of populations is not only the reserve of shady start-ups, disturbingly, it is becoming the modus operandi in modern politics.”

Directors Amer and Noujaim first came to prominence for their Academy Award nominated film “The Square,” which looked at social media as a catalyst for the 2011 Egyptian uprisings.

“We ultimately made a film about whether we have free will. It’s about democracy and it’s about complicity,” they said of their latest documentary. “These are arguably the most important questions of our time.” (VOA)