Friday March 22, 2019

Consuming Tomatoes Can Help to Fight Liver Cancer, Inflammation

Eat tomatoes to fight liver cancer, inflammation

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Tomatoes (Representational image). Pixabay

Higher consumption of tomatoes could be associated with a decreased risk of liver cancer caused by high-fat diets, a study has found.

The study, conducted on mice, showed that tomatoes are rich in lycopene—a strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent—which helps in effectively reducing fatty liver disease, inflammation and liver cancer development.

“Consuming whole foods like tomatoes and processed tomatoes from sauces, tomato paste, canned whole tomato products, ketchup and juice, provides the best source of lycopene,” said Xiang-Dong Wang, Professor at Tufts University in the US.

Interestingly, we observed that tomato powder is more effective than the same dose of purified lycopene supplementation to prevent liver cancer development, said Wang.

This could be due to the potential beneficial effects of other nutrients in a whole tomato, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, folate, minerals, phenolic compounds and dietary fibres.

Eating apples and tomatoes may slow the declining of lungs
Eat tomatoes to prevent liver cancer. Wikimedia Commons

In addition, feeding mice tomato powder increased the richness and diversity of beneficial microbiota and prevented the over-growth of some bacteria related to inflammation, said the study, published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

For the study, infant mice were infected with a liver carcinogen and then fed an unhealthy high-fat diet similar to a Western diet, with or without tomato powder containing lycopene.

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Other foods including guava, watermelon, grapefruit, papaya, and sweet red pepper also contain lycopene, but in much lower concentrations compared to tomatoes.

Eating tomatoes and tomato products such as tomato sauce rich in lycopene is also associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and certain cancers, including prostate, lung, breast and colon cancer, the study showed. (IANS)

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Drinking Green Tea Can Help Reduce Obesity, Inflammation

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease

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Green tea is the second most consumed beverage.
Green tea is believed to have therapeutic intervention to cure a variety of diseases. Pixabay

Want to cut that extra flab? Drinking green tea can help reduce obesity as well as inflammation in the gut, finds a study.

The findings, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, showed that mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with green tea gained about 20 per cent less weight and had lower insulin resistance than mice fed an otherwise identical diet without tea.

Mice fed a diet of two per cent green tea extract had an improved gut health including more beneficial microbes in the intestines and less permeability in the intestinal wall — a condition called “leaky gut” — than those that ate a diet without it.

Leaky gut is a problem in humans that contributes to widespread low-grade inflammation.

“This study provides evidence that green tea encourages the growth of good gut bacteria, and that leads to a series of benefits that significantly lower the risk of obesity,” said lead author Richard Bruno, Professor at the Ohio State University.

Green tea. Pixabay

For eight weeks, the team fed half of the male mice a high-fat diet that causes obesity and half were fed a regular diet. In each of those groups, half ate green tea extract mixed with their food.

Female mice were not included as they are resistant to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

Green tea also protected against the movement of endotoxin — the toxic bacterial component — out of their guts and into the bloodstream.

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“Consuming a little throughout the course of a day with food might be better,” Bruno said.

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease. (IANS)