Tuesday January 28, 2020

Consuming Tomatoes Can Help to Fight Liver Cancer, Inflammation

Eat tomatoes to fight liver cancer, inflammation

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Tomatoes (Representational image). Pixabay

Higher consumption of tomatoes could be associated with a decreased risk of liver cancer caused by high-fat diets, a study has found.

The study, conducted on mice, showed that tomatoes are rich in lycopene—a strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent—which helps in effectively reducing fatty liver disease, inflammation and liver cancer development.

“Consuming whole foods like tomatoes and processed tomatoes from sauces, tomato paste, canned whole tomato products, ketchup and juice, provides the best source of lycopene,” said Xiang-Dong Wang, Professor at Tufts University in the US.

Interestingly, we observed that tomato powder is more effective than the same dose of purified lycopene supplementation to prevent liver cancer development, said Wang.

This could be due to the potential beneficial effects of other nutrients in a whole tomato, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, folate, minerals, phenolic compounds and dietary fibres.

Eating apples and tomatoes may slow the declining of lungs
Eat tomatoes to prevent liver cancer. Wikimedia Commons

In addition, feeding mice tomato powder increased the richness and diversity of beneficial microbiota and prevented the over-growth of some bacteria related to inflammation, said the study, published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

For the study, infant mice were infected with a liver carcinogen and then fed an unhealthy high-fat diet similar to a Western diet, with or without tomato powder containing lycopene.

Also Read- Smoking Marijuana May Lead to Junk Food Binge

Other foods including guava, watermelon, grapefruit, papaya, and sweet red pepper also contain lycopene, but in much lower concentrations compared to tomatoes.

Eating tomatoes and tomato products such as tomato sauce rich in lycopene is also associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and certain cancers, including prostate, lung, breast and colon cancer, the study showed. (IANS)

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Even Short-term ‘Vaping’ can Cause Inflammation, Says Study

With the recent reports of lung disease and deaths associated with vaping, the effects of vaping nicotine and marijuana oils makes this research more critical, said the researchers

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US, CDC, Vaping
FILE - A high school student uses a vaping device near the school's campus in Cambridge, Mass., April 11, 2018. VOA

E-cigarette use has risen at concerning levels among both smokers and non-smokers and now researchers from the Ohio State University have found that even short-term vaping could cause cellular inflammation in never-smoker adults.

Using a procedure called bronchoscopy to test for inflammation and smoking-related effects, researchers reported a measurable increase in inflammation after four weeks of e-cigarette use without nicotine or flavours.

The study suggested that even short-term usage could result in inflammatory changes at a cellular level.

“Through the randomised clinical trial of healthy never-smokers over a month, we found that an increase in urinary propylene glycol, a marker of inhalation-e-cig intake, was significantly correlated with increased inflammatory response in the lung,” said the study’s first author Min-Ae Song from Ohio State University.

For the study, researchers recruited 30 healthy, non-smoking volunteers to directly assess the impact of tobacco and e-cig use on the lungs through bronchoscopy, an outpatient test in which a doctor inserts a thin tube through the nose or mouth to view the airways.

Vaping, teeth,e-cigarette, cigarettes
Nicotine vaping on rise among US teenagers: Survey. Pixabay

A small sample of lung cells was collected from fluid in the lungs.

Participants were randomised to a four-week intervention with e-cigs containing only 50 per cent propylene glycol (PG) or 50 per cent vegetable glycerine (VG) without nicotine or flavours.

Results from these tests were then compared to a separate control group of never-smokers.

Also Read: Heavier Babies are More Prone to Childhood Allergies: Research

Researchers did not see levels of inflammation higher than the controls, but there was an increase in inflammation among the users who inhaled more of the e-cigarette.

With the recent reports of lung disease and deaths associated with vaping, the effects of vaping nicotine and marijuana oils makes this research more critical, said the researchers. (IANS)