Monday December 16, 2019

Too Much Coffee During Pregnancy Bad for Baby’s Liver, Says New Study

For the study, the researchers investigated the effects of low (equivalent to 2-3 cups of coffee) and high doses (equivalent to 6-9 cups of coffee) of caffeine given to pregnant rats, on liver function and hormone levels of their offspring

0
//
coffee
A patron holds an iced beverage at a Starbucks coffee store in Pasadena, Calif., July 25, 2013. VOA

Ladies, limit your tea or coffee intake if you’re expecting, as researchers have found that excess caffeine intake during pregnancy may impair baby’s liver development and increase the risk of liver disease in adulthood.

In a study on rats, it was found that pregnant rats, which were given caffeine, had offspring with lower birth weight, altered growth and stress hormone levels and impaired liver development.

Published in the Journal of Endocrinology, the study indicates that consuming 2-3 cups of coffee a day may alter stress and growth hormone levels in a manner that can impair development of baby’s liver.

“Our results indicate that prenatal caffeine causes an excess of stress hormone activity in the mother, which inhibits IGF-1 activity for liver development before birth. However, compensatory mechanisms do occur after birth to accelerate growth and restore normal liver function as IGF-1 activity increases and stress hormone signalling decreases,” said study co-author Yinxian Wen from the Wuhan University in China.

Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a hormone that plays an important role in childhood growth. “The increased risk of fatty liver disease, caused by prenatal caffeine exposure, is most likely a consequence of this enhanced, compensatory postnatal IGF-1 activity,” Wen said.

Technology, Privacy
A model wears the Owlet Band pregnancy monitor at the Owlet booth at CES International, Jan. 9, 2019, in Las Vegas. The device can track fetal heart rate, kicks and contractions. VOA

For the study, the researchers investigated the effects of low (equivalent to 2-3 cups of coffee) and high doses (equivalent to 6-9 cups of coffee) of caffeine given to pregnant rats, on liver function and hormone levels of their offspring.

“Our work suggests that prenatal caffeine is not good for babies and although these findings still need to be confirmed in people, I would recommend that women avoid caffeine during pregnancy,” Wen said.

Also Read: Qualcomm, Sony Ramp up 5G Testing in UK with New Lab

Sweta Gupta, Clinical Director and Senior Consultant at Fertility Solutions, Medicover Fertility in Delhi, agreed that too much of caffeine could be harmful for the baby. “Pregnancy is a time of craving and mood swings. Some consider coffee for relief in such situations,” she said.

However, according to Harshal Rajekar, Consultant Gastro Surgeon, Columbia Asia Hospital in Pune, there is hardly any evidence showing that caffeine is harmful for pregnant woman or her baby’s liver though it’s true that excess of caffeine can affect sleep and may deprive the mother of adequate rest during pregnancy, which can, in turn, harm both the mother and the child. (IANS)

Next Story

Most Pregnant Women Depend on Their Mothers For Guidance: Study

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months

0
Pregnant Women
The study also found that Pregnant Women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance -- information that only their mothers could contribute. Pixabay

Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests.

For the study, published in the journal Reproduction, the research team from University of Cincinnati, investigated the complexities within mother-daughter dynamics during pregnancy in relation to potentially harmful advice from many pregnancy guidebooks, looking specifically at the emotional and health care risks to certain groups.

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months.

“I found that most pregnancy self-help books, best known for their month-by-month guidance on fetal development and lifestyle coaching, are also empathic about following medical advice exclusively over what they consider the outdated advice of a mother or friend,” said study researcher Danielle Bessett from University of Cincinnati.

“This advice is limited and can result in an increased level of stress and discomfort for some soon-to-be moms,” Bessett added.

While looking at two groups — pregnant women with at least a bachelor’s degree and women with no college or higher education — Bessett found that all pregnant women took steps to have a healthy pregnancy.

But while the researcher identified a pervasive link to a mother’s influence on her daughter’s health and well-being in both groups, it was especially strong for minorities and women with less than a college degree who had little trust in their medical personnel.

Women with higher education engaged with their mothers in ways much more similar to how they are framed in common self-help books.

“Self-help books are giving us a really terrible picture of soon-to-be grandmothers that pregnant women themselves don’t really fully endorse regardless of who they are,” said Bessett.

“I argue that books are strictly endorsing medical guidance exclusively and that’s not the only place where women are getting their information,” Besset added.

 

Pregnant Women
Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests. Pixabay

While highly educated women engaged with their mothers in a more limited way, women with lower education engaged with their mothers more in-depth about everything and ranked their mothers as the most valuable source of information, the study said.

ALSO READ: Marine Animals Can Help Humans Monitor Oceans: Study

The study also found that women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance — information that only their mothers could contribute.

“One of the most distinctive differences between the two groups showed how much more women with higher education valued how scientific information and modern technology could contribute to a healthy pregnancy,” said Bessett. (IANS)