Friday July 20, 2018

A tool which can predict cancer

Researchers develop a tool to predict cancer in men

0
//
60
Researchers developed a tool which can predict cancer in men. Pixabay
Researchers developed a tool which can predict cancer in men. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint
  • A tool has been developed for predicting the onset of prostate cancer in men.
  • Score from a PSA test is very versatile and can be applied to many age related diseases.
  • This study was published in journal BMJ.

A genetic prognostic tool has been developed by a team of researchers that may help in predicting the age of onset of prostate cancer in men.

Polygenic hazard score is intended to inform men whether to undergo Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test. The score can be calculated at any time since an individual’s genotype does not change.

You may also like: Night shifts may increase cancer risk

How the score works

The score involves survival analysis to estimate the effect of individual genomes for small variations, called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), on age at diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer.

This is especially critical for men at risk of developing prostate cancer at a very young age before standard guidelines recommend consideration of screening.

Prostrate cancer is one of the most common in men. Pixabay
Prostate cancer is one of the most common in men. Pixabay

“The polygenic hazard score is very versatile and can be applied to many age-related diseases,” said Chun Chieh Fan, from the University of California – San Diego.

Also read: Pregnancy seems Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors: Study

“In this case, the polygenic hazard score of prostate cancer captures the age variations of aggressive prostate cancer.”

The score has already been proven to be very useful in predicting the age of onset for Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers said.

Other than prostate cancer, lung cancer is most common amongst men. Pixabay
Other than prostate cancer, lung cancer is most common amongst men. Pixabay

How it was done

When men with a high polygenic hazard score were compared to those with average polygenic hazard score, their risk of aggressive prostate cancer was at least 2.9 times greater, the researchers said, adding that this kind of genetic risk stratification is a step toward individualised medicine.

Further, PSA tests are much more predictive of aggressive prostate cancer in men with high polygenic hazard score than in those with low polygenic hazard score. This suggests that the score can help physicians determine whether to order a PSA test for a given patient.

The study was published in journal BMJ. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Eating Dinner Early May Lower Risk of Breast, Prostate Cancer

The research suggests that long-term late night snacking may have the similar effect to night-shift work and circadian disruption

0
dinner
The researchers found that cancer patients were more likely to have dinner late at night. Pixabay

Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer, suggests a new study.

Compared to those who have supper after 10 pm or those who go to bed right after meal, people who take their evening meal before 9 pm or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have approximately 20 per cent lower risk of those types of cancers, the findings showed.

“Our study concludes that adherence to diurnal eating patterns is associated with a lower risk of cancer,” said lead author Manolis Kogevinas from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in Spain.

“The findings highlight the importance of assessing circadian rhythms in studies on diet and cancer,” Kogevinas added.

For the study, published in International Journal of Cancer, the team analysed data from 621 cases of prostate cancer and 1,205 cases of breast cancer, as well as 872 male and 1,321 female controls.

Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer
Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Pixabay

The participants, were interviewed about their meal timing, sleep habits and chronotype — an individual attribute correlating with preference for morning or evening activity.

The participants also completed a questionnaire on their eating habits and adherence to cancer prevention recommendations.

The researchers found that cancer patients were more likely to have dinner late at night.

Also Read: Meditation Improves Mood, Sleep in Teenagers with Cancer

Breast and prostate cancers are also among those most strongly associated with night-shift work, circadian disruption and alteration of biological rhythms.

The research suggests that long-term late night snacking may have the similar effect to night-shift work and circadian disruption.

“If the findings are confirmed, they will have implications for cancer prevention recommendations, which currently do not take meal timing into account,” Kogevinas noted. (IANS)