Wednesday January 29, 2020

Tooth Loss Linked To Greater Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

The causal association between oral disease and cardiovascular disease is not well known, so researchers in a study conducted a secondary analysis

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Cardiovascular Disease
Missing teeth are more likely to develop Cardiovascular Disease, even after adjusting for other Lifestyle factors such as body mass index, age, race, alcohol consumption, smoking, diabetes and dental visits. Pixabay

Researchers have found that adults who have lost teeth due to non-traumatic reasons might have a higher risk of developing Cardiovascular Disease (CVD).

“If a person’s teeth fall out, there may be other underlying health concerns. Clinicians should be recommending that people in this age group receive adequate oral health care to prevent the diseases that lead to tooth loss in the first place and as potentially another way of reducing risk of future cardiovascular disease,” said study lead author Hamad Mohammed Qabha, MBBS from Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University.

The causal association between oral disease and cardiovascular disease is not well known, so researchers in this study conducted a secondary analysis of the 2014 Behaviour Risk Factor Surveillance System that looked at tooth loss not caused by trauma, as well as cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, angina and stroke.

The study included 316,588 participants from the US and territories between the ages of 40-79.

Cardiovascular Disease
Researchers have found that adults who have lost teeth due to non-traumatic reasons might have a higher risk of developing Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). Pixabay

Overall eight per cent were edentulous (had no teeth) and 13 per cent had cardiovascular disease.

The percentage of people who had cardiovascular disease and were edentulous was 28 per cent, compared to only seven per cent who had cardiovascular disease but did not have missing teeth.

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In addition to edentulous participants, those who reported having one to five missing teeth or six or more, but not all, missing teeth were also more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, even after adjusting for other factors such as body mass index, age, race, alcohol consumption, smoking, diabetes and dental visits. (IANS)

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Help in Reducing Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Study

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals

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Cancer
Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer. Pixabay

Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study, published in the British Journal of Surgery (BJS), showed that patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a greater than 35 per cent reduction in the risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with obese individuals who had no surgery.

“Day by day, the scientific community is continuing to uncover the benefits of weight- loss surgery, and this paper affirms this,” said study lead author Sulaiman Almazeedi from Jaber Al-Ahmed Hospital in Kuwait.

“Obesity today remains one of the most preventable causes of morbid disease and early death, and despite the controversy, we believe weight-loss surgery can be an important tool in tackling this epidemic,” Almazeedi added.

Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer.

According to the researchers, the BJS analysis, which included seven studies with a total of 12,13,727 patients and an average follow-up of seven years, was conducted because individual studies have presented conflicting results.

Cancer
Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Pixabay

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals.

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The overall risk of developing colorectal cancer was three in 1,000 in patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery, compared with four in 1,000 in those who did not, the study said. (IANS)