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Top Facebook Strategist to Step Down

In his tenure at Facebook, Schrage became one of the most influential voices inside the company

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LinkedIn faced probe for Facebook ads targeting 18 mn non-members. Pixabay

Facebook’s Public Policy and Communications Head Elliot Schrage who came under fire for shaping highly-criticised public reaction to various scandals including the 2016 US presidential election has decided to quit.

Schrage joined Facebook in 2008 after leaving his job in the same role at Google.

“After more than a decade at Facebook, I’ve decided it’s time to start a new chapter in my life. Leading policy and communications for hyper-growth technology companies is a joy but it’s also intense and leaves little room for much else,” he wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday.

Facebook mobile app
Facebook mobile app, Pixabay

“Mark (Zuckerberg) and Sheryl (Sandberg) have asked me to stay to manage the transition and then to stay on as an advisor to help on particular projects — and I’m happy to help,” he added.

In his tenure at Facebook, Schrage became one of the most influential voices inside the company.

Also Read: Facebook May Unveil Eye-Tracking Technology in Future

“A spate of recent controversies around the mismanagement of the massive platform has weighed on the company and some have justifiably criticised Facebook’s slow and overly cautious response to the crisis. Schrage has been the point person on that response,” said ReCode in a report.

Schrage has been a key figure in shaping Facebook’s response to Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal. (IANS)

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4,000 Viewed NZ Mosques Shootings Live, Claims Facebook

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram

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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. Facebook said it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. VOA

Facing the flak over its inability to spot and remove the livestreaming of New Zealand mosque’s shooting, Facebook on Tuesday said 4,000 people viewed it before being taken down.

“The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast,” Chris Sonderby, VP and Deputy General Counsel, said in a blog-post. “Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4,000 times in total before being removed from Facebook,” Sonderby added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcasted graphic footage of shooting via Facebook Live for nearly 17 minutes. It was later shared in millions on other social media platforms.

Fifty people were killed in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian national Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

According to Facebook, the first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended. “Before we were alerted to the video, a user on ‘8chan’ posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site,” said Sonderby.

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This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

“We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface,” he said.

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram.

Also Read- Netflix Not to Integrate its Services with Apple Streaming Platform

“Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems, including the use of audio technology,” Sonderby said.

“In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services,” he said. (IANS)