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Top Facebook Strategist to Step Down

In his tenure at Facebook, Schrage became one of the most influential voices inside the company

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Independent body to moderate content at Facebook. Pixabay
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Facebook’s Public Policy and Communications Head Elliot Schrage who came under fire for shaping highly-criticised public reaction to various scandals including the 2016 US presidential election has decided to quit.

Schrage joined Facebook in 2008 after leaving his job in the same role at Google.

“After more than a decade at Facebook, I’ve decided it’s time to start a new chapter in my life. Leading policy and communications for hyper-growth technology companies is a joy but it’s also intense and leaves little room for much else,” he wrote in a Facebook post on Thursday.

Facebook mobile app
Facebook mobile app, Pixabay

“Mark (Zuckerberg) and Sheryl (Sandberg) have asked me to stay to manage the transition and then to stay on as an advisor to help on particular projects — and I’m happy to help,” he added.

In his tenure at Facebook, Schrage became one of the most influential voices inside the company.

Also Read: Facebook May Unveil Eye-Tracking Technology in Future

“A spate of recent controversies around the mismanagement of the massive platform has weighed on the company and some have justifiably criticised Facebook’s slow and overly cautious response to the crisis. Schrage has been the point person on that response,” said ReCode in a report.

Schrage has been a key figure in shaping Facebook’s response to Cambridge Analytica data breach scandal. (IANS)

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Facebook Seeking To Patent a Software To Build User’s Profile

Around 29 million Facebook accounts were hacked in September

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Facebook seeks to patent software to analyse who lives with you. Pixabay

Despite facing flak for leakage of personal data of millions of its users in recent times, Facebook is seeking to patent a software that could help it build profile of an user’s household – the number of people in the household, the interests that they share, nature of their relationships or even the devices that they use.

The software, which could be used to target ads, would analyse images posted to Facebook or Instagram, The Los Angeles Times reported on Friday.

An online system that predicts household features of a user — household size and demographic composition — provides improved and targeted content delivery to the user and the user’s household, according to the patent application.

To help determine whether people live in the same home, the software could look at how often people are tagged in pictures together and at the captions of the photos, it said.

“Without such knowledge of a user’s household features, most of content items that are sent to the user are poorly tailored to the user and are likely ignored,” said the patent application, which was filed last year and made public on Thursday.

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Facebook, social media. Pixabay

Facebook could also incorporate “past posts, status updates, friendships, messaging history, past tagging history” and web browsing history to put together a profile of a household or family, the report added.

The proposed online system seeks to apply one or more models trained using deep learning techniques to generate the predictions.

“For example, a trained image analysis model identifies each individual depicted in the photos of the user; a trained text analysis model derive household member relationship information from the user’s profile data and tags associated with the photos,” stated the application.

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Those profiles, in turn, could be made available to third parties that want to target “content” to users, it said.

Facebook told The Los Angeles Times that applying for the patent does not necessarily mean it will build or use the software.

Around 29 million Facebook accounts were hacked in September. (IANS)