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Total Ban on Sale and Consumption of Liquor, Non-Vegetarian Foods around Varanasi Temples

The decision was taken at the executive committee of the VMC chaired my Mayor Mridula Jaiswal

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liquor, non vegetarian foods, varanasi temples
Yadav said that alcohol and non-vegetarian food should be banned near the temples and heritage sites on the lines of similar rules in Haridwar and Ayodhya. Wikimedia Commons

A total ban has been imposed on sale and consumption of liquor and non-vegetarian food within a 250 metre radius of all temples and heritage sites in Varanasi.

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath had earlier in April, announced a ban on liquor shops and sale of non-vegetarian food at all places of worships including Varanasi, Vrindavan, Ayodhya, Chitrakoot, Deoband, Dewa Sharif, Misrikh-Naimisharanya.

He had directed officers of the Excise Department to prohibit the sale of liquor with a kilometre of Kashi Vishwanath temple in Varanasi, Krishna Janambhoomi in Mathura and the Sangam area in Allahabad.

liquor, non vegetarian foods, varanasi temples
He had directed officers of the Excise Department to prohibit the sale of liquor with a kilometre of Kashi Vishwanath temple in Varanasi, Krishna Janambhoomi in Mathura and the Sangam area in Allahabad. Wikimedia Commons

The Varanasi Municipal Corporation (VMC), two days ago, passed a proposal for a complete ban on alcohol and non-vegetarian food in a 250-metre periphery near temples and heritage sites in this ancient pilgrim town, a top official said. The decision was taken at the executive committee of the VMC chaired my Mayor Mridula Jaiswal.

Narsingh Das, deputy chairman at VMC, said: “In the meeting of executive committee, corporator Rajesh Yadav put up a proposal for complete ban on liquor and non-vegetarian food near the temples and Heritage sites in 250-metre periphery.”

In support of his proposal, Yadav said that alcohol and non-vegetarian food should be banned near the temples and heritage sites on the lines of similar rules in Haridwar and Ayodhya.

non vegetarian foods, liquor, varanasi temples
The Varanasi Municipal Corporation (VMC), two days ago, passed a proposal for a complete ban on alcohol and non-vegetarian food in a 250-metre periphery near temples and heritage sites in this ancient pilgrim town, a top official said. Wikimedia Commons

Das said that the committee passed the proposal after a discussion. It will now be tabled in the next session of Varanasi Municipal Corporation. After being passed in the session, it will be sent to the state government for final approval.

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The Kashi Vishwanath temple, in 2017, had started the facility of online booking of ‘aarti’ and purchase of tickets for ‘darshan’. Those who are unable to visit the temple personally can see the ‘aarti’ online and get the ‘prasad’ by post.

Varanasi is Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Lok Sabha constituency. It is also regarded as the country’s spiritual capital with some 2,000 temples, including Kashi Vishwanath, and is a top destination for performing funeral rites. The holy city also draws Hindu pilgrims for bathing in the sacred waters of the Ganga that flows through Varanasi. (IANS)

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A Brain Circuit Can Help Reverse Craving for Liquor, Says Study

Rats were surgically implanted with optic fibres aimed to shine light on the CRF neurons -- to make them inactive at the flip of a switch

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A photo made with a fisheye lens shows bottles of alcohol in a liquor store in Salt Lake City. The National Institutes of Health said Friday that it was canceling a study of moderate drinking's health benefits because the results could not be trusted. Beer and liquor companies were helping to underwrite it.
This June 16, 2016, file photo, taken with a fisheye lens, shows bottles of alcohol during a tour of a state liquor store, in Salt Lake City. Cheap liquor, wine and beer have long been best-sellers among Utah alcohol drinkers, but new numbers from Utah's tightly-controlled liquor system show local craft brews, trendy box wines and flavored whiskies are also popular choices in a largely teetotaler state. VOA

Scientists have found that they can reverse the urge to drink alcohol, finds a study, which may open the door to developing drug or gene therapies to control alcohol addiction.

The team at US-based Scripps Research used a laser treatment to temporarily inactivate a specific neuron, which not only reversed alcohol-seeking behaviour but also reduced the physical symptoms of withdrawal.

“This discovery is exciting. It means we have another piece of the puzzle to explain the neural mechanism driving alcohol consumption,” said Olivier George, Associate Professor at Scripps.

Although the treatment is far from ready for human use, George believes identifying these neurons opens the door to developing drug therapies or even gene therapies to control alcohol addiction.

For the study, reported in Nature Communications journal, the team tested the role of a subset of neurons in the ensemble, called corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons. They found these CRF neurons make up 80 per cent of the ensemble.

Liquor (Representational image).

Rats were surgically implanted with optic fibres aimed to shine light on the CRF neurons — to make them inactive at the flip of a switch.

Once rats were alcohol dependent, the researchers withdrew alcohol, prompting withdrawal symptoms in rats. When they were offered alcohol again, rats drank more than ever. The CeA neuronal ensemble was active, telling rats to drink more.

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When the CRF neurons were inactivated, rats immediately returned to their pre-dependent drinking levels. The intense motivation to drink had gone. Inactivating these neurons also reduced the physical symptoms of withdrawal, such as abnormal gait and shaking.

“We were able to characterise, target and manipulate a critical subset of neurons responsible for excessive drinking,” said Giordano de Guglielmo, staff scientist at Scripps. (IANS)