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Traditional Division of labor between Sexes: Women in Kitchen, Men in Yard?

The survey found that 82 percent of Americans said that women should be responsible for a child’s physical needs

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A new study finds most Americans still believe in a traditional division of labor between the sexes. (Photo by Nathan Rupert via Creative Commons license). Image source: VOA

Sept 04, 2016: The United States could elect its first woman president in November, but most Americans still believe in the traditional division of household jobs, according to a new study.

The study, which surveyed 1,000 adults, was released at this month’s meeting of the American Sociological Association in Seattle, Washington.

Three in four adults believe that in a couple with a man and a woman, the woman should do most housework, the study found. That includes cooking, the laundry, and cleaning the house.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during United States presidential election. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during United States presidential election. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 90 percent believe that the man should do the automobile repairs and outdoor work.

The survey found that 82 percent of Americans said that women should be responsible for a child’s physical needs. Seventy-two percent said woman should also take care of a child’s emotional needs.

Discipline is an exception

The exception, in the question of childcare, is discipline. Fifty-five percent said men should deal with discipline of children.

And if a couple decides a parent is needed at home to take care of children, 62 percent said it should be the woman, not the man, who stays home.

“Sex was by far the strongest determinant of which tasks people assigned to each spouse in heterosexual couples,” said Natasha Quadlin, lead author of the study, who is a doctoral student in sociology at Indiana University.

Working with her on the study was Long Doan, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Maryland.

Survey released before presidential election

The study’s release comes less than three months before Americans vote for a new a president — choosing between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump. If Clinton wins, she would be America’s first woman president.

For same-sex couples, the study found most Americans believe the decisions about who does what should be decided by which partner is most feminine and which is more masculine.

Sixty percent of Americans said the most feminine partners should cook and buy the food. Sixty-seven percent said that the more masculine partners should handle car repairs and do outdoor work.

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Old stereotypes

Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, is surprised that a majority of Americans support divisions of work based on old stereotypes.

Old stereotypes about what women do better and what men do better do not make sense for many couples, O’Neill said.

For example, O’Neill said she could fix the family car far better than her ex-husband. But she said her former husband was very good at comforting their daughter. She said he also was able to get her to appointments on time, despite the stereotype that men do not do those tasks very well.

In O’Neill’s opinion, too many couples let one partner, often the man, make decisions about who does the work. What should happen is a “sharing of power, and sharing of decisions,” with negotiations to decide who does what and when, she said.

It does not seem to matter that many women are working as hard if not harder and earning as much, if not more, than their husbands, said Natasha Quadlin.

“Even if women have higher earnings than their husbands they are expected to come home and perform a second shift of chores and childcare,” she said.

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However, men may pay a price for taking on the outside work responsibilities by themselves.

Another study found that men’s psychological well-being and health declined when they were their families’ only member earning an income. Researchers from the University of Connecticut carried out that study, which also was presented at the American Sociological Association meeting. (VOA)

Next Story

Caravans Inflame the Debate Over United States Immigration Policy

Some of the migrants expected to stay in Mexico to find work but it was too early to say how many, she said.

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Migrants from Honduras, part of a new caravan from Central America trying to reach the United States, show their bracelets in an immigration facility in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Jan. 17, 2019. (VOA)

Almost 1,000 Central American migrants entered southern Mexico Thursday in a test of the new government’s pledge to manage an ongoing exodus fueled by violence and poverty that has strained relations with the Trump administration.

Mexico’s National Migration Institute said 969 migrants from Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua crossed into Ciudad Hidalgo just days after new U.S.-bound caravans of people set off from Central America.

Caravans from Central America have  with U.S. President Donald Trump using the migrants to try to secure backing for his plan to build a border wall on the frontier with Mexico.

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Caravans from Central America have inflamed the debate over U.S. immigration policy, with U.S. President Donald Trump using the migrants to try to secure backing for his plan to build a border wall on the frontier with Mexico., VOA

Humanitarian approach

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is pursuing a “humanitarian” approach to the problem, vowing to stem the flow of people by finding jobs for the migrants. In exchange, he wants Trump to help spur economic development in the region.

The U.S. government has been partially shut down for more than three weeks as Democrats resist Trump’s demand that Congress provide $5.7 billion to fund his planned wall.

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Migrants from Honduras, part of a new caravan from Central America trying to reach the United States, wait to be processed in an immigration facility in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Jan. 17, 2019. (voa)

Mexican officials put wristbands on the migrants as they entered the country to monitor the flow of people. The bands must be kept until the migrants register with authorities.

Once registered, migrants who met the requirements to stay would be issued humanitarian visas, allowing them to work in Mexico or continue to the U.S. border, said Ana Laura Martinez de Lara, director general of migratory control and verification.

Those who entered Mexico at the official border crossing had done so in a “very orderly” and respectful manner, in contrast to clashes that took place at the frontier in October when a larger caravan began crossing from Guatemala, she said.

Some of the migrants expected to stay in Mexico to find work but it was too early to say how many, she said.

Also Read: Donald Trump to Unveil Missile Defence Review

Hundreds waiting to cross

Martinez de Lara said about 700 people were still waiting to cross into Mexico from Tecun Uman on the Guatemalan side of the border. She could not say if any people had tried to cross into Mexico illegally.

Mexico’s government said Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard planned to meet U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo soon for talks on their efforts to address the migration challenge. No date was yet set for the talks, a ministry spokeswoman said.( VOA)