Saturday December 7, 2019

Transdermal Optical Imaging Measures Blood Pressure in Smartphone-Captured Facial Videos

Ambient light penetrates the skin's outer layer allowing digital optical sensors in smartphones to visualise and extract blood flow patterns

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Transdermal, Optical Imaging, Blood Pressure
This study shows that facial video can contain some information about systolic blood pressure. Pixabay

In good news for people who have blood pressure (BP) problems, monitoring BP might one day become as easy as taking a video selfie.

Researchers, including one of an Indian-origin, have tested a technology called transdermal optical imaging that measures blood pressure by detecting blood flow changes in smartphone-captured facial videos.

“This study shows that facial video can contain some information about systolic blood pressure,” said Indian-origin researcher Ramakrishna Mukkamala, Professor at the Michigan State University.

Ambient light penetrates the skin’s outer layer allowing digital optical sensors in smartphones to visualise and extract blood flow patterns, which transdermal optical imaging models can use to predict blood pressure.

Transdermal, Optical Imaging, Blood Pressure
In good news for people who have blood pressure (BP) problems, monitoring BP might one day become as easy as taking a video selfie. Pixabay

“High blood pressure is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease — a leading cause of death and disability. To manage and prevent it, regular monitoring of one’s blood pressure is essential,” said study lead author Kang Lee, Professor at the University of Toronto in Canada.

“Cuff-based blood pressure measuring devices, while highly accurate, are inconvenient and uncomfortable. Users tend not to follow American Heart Association guidelines and device manufacturers’ suggestion to take multiple measurements each time,” Lee said.

For the study, published in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, the research team measured the blood flow of 1,328 Canadian and Chinese adults by capturing two-minute videos using an iPhone equipped with transdermal optical imaging software.

The researchers compared systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure measurements captured from smartphone videos to blood pressure readings using a traditional cuff-based continuous blood pressure measurement device.

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The researchers used the data to teach the technology how to accurately determine blood pressure and pulse from facial blood flow patterns.

They found that on average, transdermal optical imaging predicted systolic blood pressure with nearly 95 per cent accuracy and diastolic blood pressure with pulse pressure at nearly 96 per cent accuracy.

The technology’s high accuracy is within international standards for devices used to measure blood pressure, according to Lee.

Transdermal, Optical Imaging, Blood Pressure
Researchers, including one of an Indian-origin, have tested a technology called transdermal optical imaging that measures blood pressure by detecting blood flow changes in smartphone-captured facial videos. Pixabay

Researchers videoed faces in a well-controlled environment with fixed lighting, so it is unclear whether the technology can accurately measure blood pressure in less controlled environments, including homes.

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Also, while the study participants had a variety of skin tones, the sample lacked subjects with either extremely dark or fair skin. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why People Suffering from Lifestyle Diseases Should Have Proper Sleep

Short sleep duration should be included as a useful risk factor to predict the long-term outcomes of people with these health conditions

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The increased risk of early death for people with high blood pressure or diabetes is negligible if they Sleep for more than six hours. Pixabay

Those with high blood pressure, Type-2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk of cancer and early death when have a Sleep less than six hours a day, says a study.

“Our study suggests that achieving normal sleep may be protective for some people with these health conditions and risks,” said lead study author Julio Fernandez-Mendoza from Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey in Pennsylvania, US.

“However, further research is needed to examine whether improving and increasing sleep through medical or behavioural therapies can reduce risk of early death,” Fernandez-Mendoza said.

For the study, the researchers analysed the data of more than 1,600 adults who were categorised into two groups as having stage 2 high blood pressure or Type-2 diabetes and having heart disease or stroke.

Participants were studied in the sleep laboratory for one night and then researchers tracked their cause of death up to the end of 2016.

The researchers found that of the 512 people who passed away, one-third died of heart disease or stroke and one-fourth died due to cancer.

People who had high blood pressure or diabetes and slept less than six hours had twice the increased risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, showed the findings published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Those with high blood pressure, Type-2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk of cancer and early death when have a Sleep less than six hours a day, says a study. Pixabay

People who had heart disease or stroke and slept less than six hours had three times the increased risk of dying from cancer.

The increased risk of early death for people with high blood pressure or diabetes was negligible if they slept for more than six hours, the research showed.

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“Short sleep duration should be included as a useful risk factor to predict the long-term outcomes of people with these health conditions and as a target of primary and specialised clinical practices,” Fernandez-Mendoza said. (IANS)