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Transgenders may Produce Viable Sperm: Study

We were interested in examining the timeline for getting viable sperm after stopping masculinity-suppressing medication

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Transgenders, Viable, Sperm
The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that one transgender woman was able to produce viable sperm after a few months of discontinuing her puberty-halting medication whereas a different patient on hormone therapy could not produce sperm during the time. Pixabay

Researchers have reported two cases in which young transgender women attempted to recover their fertility after stopping gender-affirming medications.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, found that one transgender woman was able to produce viable sperm after a few months of discontinuing her puberty-halting medication whereas a different patient on hormone therapy could not produce sperm during the time she could psychologically tolerate being off her medication.

“We were interested in examining the timeline for getting viable sperm after stopping masculinity-suppressing medication,” said lead author Hanna Valli-Pulaski, Assistant Professor at Magee-Womens Research Institute.

“Going on and off gender-affirming medications can cause psychological distress in this population and it’s important patients have a discussion with their health care provider before starting or stopping any treatment,” Valli-Pulaski added.

Transgenders, Viable, Sperm
Researchers have reported two cases in which young transgender women attempted to recover their fertility after stopping gender-affirming medications. Pixabay

For the study, the research team examined medical records of two transgender women who tried to preserve their sperm after stopping hormone therapy and compared their semen quality against eight other transgender women who elected to preserve their sperm before beginning therapy.

All of the participants came through the Fertility Preservation Program in Pittsburgh between 2015 and 2018 as young adults.

One of the patients who elected to preserve their sperm after beginning therapy had been taking the drug Lupron — a sex hormone blocker that halts puberty when taken in adolescence — for six months. She elected to stop taking Lupron to attempt sperm cryopreservation.

Five months later, she was able to produce a sperm sample comparable to those collected from the eight transgender women who saved their sperm prior to undergoing treatment.

Also Read- Whole Body Vibration (WBV) Significantly Improve How Well Our Body Uses Glucose as Energy

According to the researchers, for male-to-female transgender individuals, facial hair can start to sprout and the voice begin to deepen after just a few months of stopping medication. It’s possible to reverse these effects, but it would take time. (IANS)

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Father’s stress linked to kids’ brain development

The researchers noted that by learning more about links between a father's exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders

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But, administration of a drug that chemically blocks NkB-specific receptors enabled the stressed mice to behave normally, eliminating the negative effects of social isolation.
Representational image. Wikimedia Commons
  • According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child
  • Research found that the father’s sperm showed changes in a genetic material known as microRNA

Fathers, take note! Taking too much stress may affect the brain development of your kids, a new study has claimed.

According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child.

This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of their kids, the researchers said.

Previously, the researchers including Tracy Bale at the University of Maryland School found that adult male mice, experiencing chronic periods of mild stress, have offspring with a reduced response to stress; changes in stress reactivity have been linked to some neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and PTSD.

Also Read: Surgical Infections More Common in Low-Income Countries, Study Finds

They isolated the mechanism of the reduced response; they found that the father’s sperm showed changes in a genetic material known as microRNA.

MicroRNA are important because they play a key role in which genes become functional proteins.

According to the researchers, the stress changes the father's sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child.
According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child. Wikimedia Commons

Now, the researchers have unravelled new details about these microRNA changes.

In the male reproductive tract, the caput epididymis, the structure where sperm matures, releases tiny vesicles packed with microRNA that can fuse with sperm to change its cargo delivered to the egg, they said.

The caput epididymis responded to the father’s stress by altering the content of these vesicles, the researchers added.

Also Read: Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

The result of the study, presented at AAAS 2018 annual meeting in Austin, suggests that even mild environmental challenges can have a significant impact on the development and potentially the health of future offspring.

The researchers also noted that by learning more about links between a father’s exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders. (IANS)