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Transport Ministry in India Offers Highways to lay Optic Fibres, Oil and Gas Pipes

India's 2 lakh kilometers stretched highway has been offered by the transport ministry to be used for laying optic fibers, oil and gas pipeline

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The Indian Highway is 2 lakh kilometers long. Wikimedia
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  • To generate revenues, the transport ministry has offered its highways to be used for the laying of optic fibers, gas and oil pipes
  • Indian highway stretches 2 lakh kilometers in length
  • The revenue will be further used by transport ministry for improving the quality of roads

July 19, 2017: The Indian Highway, stretching 2 lakh kilometers in length, have been offered for the laying of optic fibers, oil and gas pipelines by the Transport Ministry.

The transport ministry hopes to generate more revenues with this decision. The revenue will be utilized for improving and maintaining the quality of roads.

Nitin Gadkari announced this decision on behalf of the ministry at INFOCOM 2017. The minister said, “For building and maintaining a competitive edge over the world, there is a need to leverage technology to get the maximum returns from assets.”

ALSO READ: Railway Board requests Finance Ministry for Separate Fund to Improve Safety of the Indian Railways

PTI also reports the announcement of computerized processes for driving license. Gadkari, speaking at INFOCOM 2017, said “The fitness of a person for issue driving license will be decided through a computer program with no human interference. This will greatly enhance safety on roads by ensuring that licenses are issued only to deserving drivers.”

The ministry’s initiative of e-tolling, implemented last year, has already made significant contributions to cut down traffic and congestion on Indian highways, observed Nitin Gadkari.

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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Bengaluru kids more exposed to toxic air: Report

Observed air quality levels exceeded safety limits by more than five times, the particulate matter count was above 400 micrograms (IG) per cubic metre, says the report

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Observed air quality levels exceeded safety limits by more than five times, the particulate matter count was above 400 micrograms (IG) per cubic metre, says the report.
Observed air quality levels exceeded safety limits by more than five times, the particulate matter count was above 400 micrograms (IG) per cubic metre, says the report. Wikimedia Commons
  • The school-goers are among the worst affected by the toxic air
  • With an existing fleet of seven million vehicles, nearly 900 new vehicles are added to the Bengaluru’s roads every day
  • Observed air quality levels exceeded safety limits by more than five times

If you are travelling in an open vehicle during peak traffic hours daily in Bengaluru, you are likely to be exposed to severe toxic air. And school-goers are among the worst affected, a report warned on Wednesday.

Between 8.30am and 10.30am, the particulate pollution levels between Banashankari to Marathahalli varied from 70-800 micrograms per cubic meter, an alarming high, says the report, “Bengaluru’s Rising Air Quality Crisis: The Need for Sustained Reportage and Action”, by independent environmental researcher Aishwarya Sudhir.

But why is Bengaluru gridlocked?

With an existing fleet of seven million vehicles, nearly 900 new vehicles are added to the Bengaluru’s roads every day.

Worsening the problem, says the report, is illegal dumping of waste mixed with mass untreated sewage.

Also Read: Neurologists say rising air pollution can cause stroke among adults

The city generates around 4,500 to 5,000 tonnes of waste per day, by conservative estimates. The state capital often referred as India’s Silicon Valley because of its information technology hub, has had its challenges with outdated waste collection, segregation and transportation system, which often results in toxic emissions.