Saturday December 14, 2019

Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

0
//
The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

Also Read: Hero Cycles to Grow 60% by 2022 and UK Will Help It 

They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)

 

Next Story

One-Third Patients Diagnosed with Lung Cancer Have Depression

One-third of lung cancer patients have depression says study

0
Depression- lung cancer
Studies have found that About one-third of patients newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer show signs of depression. Lifetime Stock

About one-third of patients newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer have moderate to severe symptoms of depression, a new study suggests.

For many of these patients — particularly those with severe symptoms — depression occurs in a toxic blend of high levels of anxiety, traumatic stress, impaired day-to-day functioning and significant pain and other physical symptoms, findings published in the journal Lung Cancer showed.

“The results suggest doctors need to screen lung cancer patients for depression and then act to refer patients for care,” said study lead author Barbara Andersen from the Ohio State University in the US.

“Some oncologists may have a mindset that ‘of course, you’re depressed, you have lung cancer.’ This may show an under-appreciation of the breadth of depressive symptoms and other difficulties which accompany it,” Andersen said.

Depression
In such patients, depression occurs in a toxic blend of high levels of anxiety and traumatic stress. Lifetime Stock

Patients with moderate or severe depressive symptoms are more likely to have lower quality of life and worse disease outcomes compared to those also diagnosed with lung cancer but with mild or no depressive symptoms.

According to the researchers, data came from 186 patients at one cancer hospital who had been recently diagnosed with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, which accounts for 85 per cent of all lung cancer cases.

Patients completed a telephone survey measuring psychological and physical symptoms, stress and day-to-day functioning.

Results showed that eight per cent of the patients scored at the severe depressive symptom level and 28 per cent had moderate depressive symptoms.

Nearly all (93 per cent) of the patients with severe depression said the depressive symptoms made it difficult to do their work, take care of things at home and get along with other people.

Compared to other cancer patients, those with high levels of depressive symptoms were much more likely to report severe physical symptoms, including 73 per cent who said they experienced ‘quite a bit’ or ‘very much’ pain.

Depression in patients
Patients with moderate or severe level of depression are more likely to have lower quality of life. Lifetime Stock

Every one of the patients with severe depressive symptoms said they had severe or moderate issues functioning with their usual activities such as work, study, housework and family or leisure activities.

In general, those with moderate depressive symptoms saw negative effects that were somewhat less — but still significant — than those with severe symptoms, the study found.

But there were two striking differences between the groups.

One was in the severity of generalised anxiety disorder (or GAD) symptoms, the most common anxiety disorder.

About 11 per cent of those with moderate depressive symptoms had moderate to severe GAD, compared to 73 per cent of patients with severe depressive symptoms.

Also Read- Children of Diabetic Mothers May Develop Heart Risks: Study

Second, many fewer of the patients with moderate depressive symptoms had impairments in self care (eight per cent versus 33 per cent in those with severe depressive symptoms), mobility (33 per cent versus 73 per cent) and usual activities (38 per cent versus 100 per cent). (IANS)