Thursday July 18, 2019

Treadmill Exercise Regime Can Reduce Pain During Periods

According to the researchers, the study examined the effect of treadmill exercise on measures such as pain intensity, sleep quality and overall quality of life

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Treadmill
Woman on a treadmill.

Women, take note — A treadmill exercise regime can reduce period pain and improve long-term quality of life, says a study.

According to the study published in the journal Contemporary Clinical Trials, the researchers conducted a trial over a seven-month period to see how treadmill exercise benefited women suffering from primary dysmenorrhea, commonly known as menstruation pain.

“Women who have painful periods often take steps to actively avoid exercise — after all when you are in pain it is often the last thing that you want to partake in,” said Leica Claydon-Mueller, Professor at Anglia Ruskin University.

For the study, women aged between 18-43 were asked to take part in a supervised aerobic training regime three times a week for four weeks, beginning the day after the end of their menstrual period, followed by unsupervised home exercise for six months.

Their results were compared with a control group, who carried out their usual regimes.

The study found that the women who took part in the supervised exercise reported 6 per cent less pain after four weeks and 22 per cent less pain while continuing the exercise for an additional six months.

Menstruation, Hindu Scholar
Sanitary napkins in frame. Pixabay

Significant benefits of exercise were reported after the seven-month reporting period for other study measures, including a higher quality of life and improved daily functioning.

However, the participants did not report any increase in sleep quality following the trial.

According to the researchers, the study examined the effect of treadmill exercise on measures such as pain intensity, sleep quality and overall quality of life.

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This trial demonstrated that exercise significantly reduced pain for those people taking part in the programme and they also reported reduced pain levels after four and seven months.

“The improvements in quality of life scores after seven months were noteworthy, although it was perhaps surprising that there was no significant difference in sleep quality to that of the control group,” said Indian origin researcher Priya Kannan from Hong Kong Polytechnic University. (IANS)

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Researchers: The Herb kratom to Treat Pain and Opioid Addiction Not Safe for Use

Kratom, a herbal supplement derived from a plant that grows throughout southeast Asia

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Herb, Kratom, Pain
Those using kratom experienced several side effects including toxicity, vomiting, hallucinations, and agitation, among others. Pixabay

Researchers have found that the herb ‘kratom’, which is increasingly being used to treat pain and opioid addiction, is not safe for use.

In the study published in the journal Pharmacotherapy, researchers from the Binghamton University observed that those using kratom experienced several side effects including toxicity, vomiting, hallucinations, and agitation, among others.

Kratom, a herbal supplement derived from a plant that grows throughout southeast Asia, is used to treat opioid use disorder, treat/prevent withdrawal or treat pain.

“Although it is not as strong as some other prescription opioids, kratom does still act as an opioid in the body. In larger doses, it can cause slowed breathing and sedation, meaning that patients can develop the same toxicity they would if using another opioid product,” said William Eggleston, Assistant Professor at the varsity.

Herb, Kratom, Pain
Researchers have found that the herb ‘kratom’, which is increasingly being used to treat pain and opioid addiction, is not safe for use. Pixabay

“It is also reported to cause seizures and liver toxicity. Kratom may have a role in treating pain and opioid use disorder but more research is needed on its safety and efficacy. Our results suggest it should not be available as a herbal supplement,” Eggleston said.

For the study, the research team conducted a retrospective review of a data containing reported cases of kratom exposures to determine the toxicities associated with its use.

A total of 2,312 kratom exposures were reported, with 935 cases involving kratom as the only substance. Kratom most commonly caused agitation (18.6 per cent), tachycardia (16.9 per cent), drowsiness (13.6 per cent), vomiting (11.2 per cent), and confusion (8.1 per cent).

Serious effects of seizure (6.1 per cent), withdrawal (6.1 per cent), hallucinations (4.8 per cent), respiratory depression (2.8 per cent), coma (2.3 per cent) and cardiac or respiratory arrest (0.6 per cent) were also reported.

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The findings suggest kratom is not reasonably safe and poses a public health threat due to its availability as a herbal supplement. (IANS)