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‘Trinidad Express’ Editor Accused of Discriminating Against Indian Writers for their Weekly Columns

A letter, written by Kumar Mahabir who is an Assistant Professor at University of Trinidad & Tobago, explains the accusation in detail

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Kumar Mahabir
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Trinidad, August 28, 2017: The Editor of a Trinidad & Tobago based newspaper called ‘Trinidad Express’ is accused of discriminating against Indian writers for their weekly columns.

A letter, written by Kumar Mahabir who is an Assistant Professor at University of Trinidad & Tobago, explains the accusation in detail.

As of now, there has been no response from Trinidad Express Editor Ms. Omatie Lyder. Kumar Mahabir’s letter can be read below-

The Secretary, Board of Directors
One Caribbean Media (OCM) Limited
Express House
35 Independence Square
Port of Spain
August 25, 2017
Dear Sir/Madam,
Bias against Indians by Express Editor, Ms Omatie Lyder
In keeping with its “national” mandate, the Express editor should be fair, balanced, diverse and objective.
Editor Ms Omatie Lutchman Lyder has been giving space to three Afro-centric columnists: Professor Selwyn Cudjoe, Keith Subero and Raffique Shah – the same three (3) Afro-centric columnists every single week.
She often provides space to a fourth Afro-centric writer, this time as a guest columnist – Professor Theodore Lewis. Ms. Omatie published Part 1 and Part 2 of his articles entitled “Kamal Persad trivialising history.” She published his two guest columns four days apart on August 11th 2017 and on August 15th 2017.
Ms. Omatie often publishes long letters by another Afro-centric writer, NJAC Chairman, Aiyegoro Ome.
Indo-oriented writers like myself (Dr. Kumar Mahabir), Kamal Persad, Dool Hanomansingh, et al. are not assured of a weekly space in the Express.
Is it time that we call for Indians to boycott sales and advertising in the Express?
If we are not given a complementary weekly space in the Express, a delegation of us plan to meet the Board of Directors of OCM to provide empirical evidence of the bias by Ms. Omatie against Indian writers with Indian perspectives.
Sincerely,
Dr Kumar Mahabir, Assistant Professor
University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT)
2011 National Award (Silver) recipient for education
Chairman, Chakra Publishing House Ltd (CPH)
Chairman, Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co. Ltd (ICC)
Vice-Chairman, Indian Caribbean Museum
10 Swami Avenue, Don Miguel Road
San Juan, Trinidad and Tobago
Tel: (868) 674-6008
Tel/fax: (868) 675-7707
Mobile (868) 756-4961
E-mail: dmahabir@gmail.com

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4 in 10 Indians Unaware of Cyberbullying: Study

Awareness about cyberbullying is the highest in Sweden and Italy (91 per cent each) and lowest in Saudi Arabia (37 per cent)

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cyberbullying
One in two parents in the current survey reported knowing a child in their community who had been cyberbullied, up from 45 per cent in 2011. Pixabay

While awareness about cyberbullying has increased in India by 10 percentage points in the past seven years, 37 per cent of adults in the country have still not heard of it, says a new study.

Globally, 25 per cent of adults are unaware of cyberbullying, according to the “Global Advisor Cyberbullying Study” on Tuesday by market research firm Ipsos.

“Cyberbullying is a grave issue and the child can be a victim not only on social networking sites, but also on mobile, online messaging, email, websites, online chatrooms, etc.,” said Parijat Chakraborty, Executive Director, Ipsos Public Affairs.

The findings also revealed that the percentage of parents who reported having a child or knowing a child in their community who has experienced cyberbullying has increased in India since 2011.

cyberbullying
Representational image. (IANS)

One in two parents in the current survey reported knowing a child in their community who had been cyberbullied, up from 45 per cent in 2011.

Notably, 37 per cent Indian respondents this year said their own child has experienced cyberbullying — up from a 32 per cent in 2011, the results showed.

The study carried out in 28 countries is based on over 20,000 interviews of adults conducted between March 23 and April 6 this year.

Also Read: McAfee Official Says, India Needs A More Secured Cybersecurity Ecosystem

Awareness about cyberbullying is the highest in Sweden and Italy (91 per cent each) and lowest in Saudi Arabia (37 per cent), the findings showed.

The study defined cyberbullying as when a child or group of children (under the age of 18) intentionally intimidate, offend, threaten, or embarrass another child or group of children, through the use of information technology, such as a website or chatroom on the Internet, a cellular phone, or another mobile device. (IANS)

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