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I Have been Targeted By Paid Trolling, Trolls Can’t Shake Me: Swara Bhaskar

Swara Bhaskar thanked for trolling

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Swara Bhaskar
Sexual harassment cases at workplace are like an epidemic: Swara. flickr
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Speaking on the current troll trail Swara says, “I have no comments for people who are petty, who are hypocritical or who slut-shame. I also have no comments for idiots. Currently I am ignoring these people and feeling very happy with the rest of the team of ‘Veere Di Wedding’ about the success of the film.

“A lot of people on social media are speaking up for me and I sincerely want to thank them all for the support.”

As far as being trolled for her masturbation sequence in “Veere Di Wedding” is concerned Swara comments, “I have been targeted by paid trolling in the past and I’m used to it. Many twitter-users and some prominent comedians and commentators have turned the ‘I took my Grandmother to watch VDW’ into very funny satirical comments on twitter . I’m grateful both for their support and their humour.”

About her contradictory opinion on Pakistan Swara clarifies, “I believe there should be a distinction between States/ Governments of a country and the civilians of that country. My regard for and goodwill towards the people of Pakistan remains unchanged. Some of my closest friends are Pakistani. Lahore remains one of my soul cities.”

Swara Bhaskar-starrer “Nil Battey Sannata”, which portrays an account of a single parent acting as a residential guarantee that her little girl gets great instruction, is having a decent keep running in the cinema world.
Swara Bhaskar-starrer “Nil Battey Sannata”, which portrays an account of a single parent acting as a residential guarantee that her little girl gets great instruction, is having a decent keep running in the cinema world. Flickr

Her last words on trolling are significant.

“I believe the social media is a virtual public place just like restaurants, parks and cinema halls. Just as we expect a decent level of behaviour we must insist on decent and decorum on social media. If we see someone being abused slammed or slut shamed in a public place wouldn’t we stand up and defend the person from being attacked.

“Likewise we must stand up and protect the social media from indecent uncivilized attacks. Basically I am engaged in debates and arguments with trolls so that that precious public space doesn’t get taken over by bullies and perverts.”

Right now Swara would rather focus on the splendid success of “Veera Di Wedding”.

Also read: Veere di wedding composer inspired by Rhea Kapoor

“The box office numbers do not surprise me. I had a gut feeling that the film would work at the box office. But the opening-day figure surprised me. I had thought we’d do a 6-cr opening on a good day. I think we have cracked the glass ceiling and myth that women-centric films cannot get big openings,” she said. (IANS)

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Facebook Expands Its Feature Showing Local Information

Facebook uses software filters to weed out objectionable content, just as it does on people's regular news feed.

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A smartphone user displays a Facebook newsfeed .VOA

Facebook is cautiously expanding a feature that shows people local news and information, including missing-person alerts, road closures, crime reports and school announcements.

Called “Today In,” the service shows people information from their towns and cities from such sources as news outlets, government entities and community groups. Facebook launched the service in January with six cities and expanded that to 25, then more. On Wednesday, “Today In” is expanding to 400 cities in the U.S. — and a few others in Australia.

The move comes as Facebook tries to shake off its reputation as a hotbed for misinformation and elections-meddling and rather a place for communities and people to come together and stay informed.

Here are some things to know about this effort, and why it matters:

Facebook
A Facebook logo is displayed at a start-up companies’ gathering in Paris, France. VOA

The big picture

It’s something users have asked for, the company says. Think of it as an evolution of a “trending” feature the company dropped earlier this year. That feature, which showed news articles that were popular among users, but was rife with such problems as fake news and accusations of bias.

Anthea Watson Strong, product manager for local news and community information, said her team learned from the problems with that feature.

“We feel deeply the mistakes of our foremothers and forefathers,” she said.

This time around, Facebook employees went to some of the cities they were launching in and met with users. They tried to predict problems by doing “pre-mortem” assessments, she said. That is, instead of a “post-mortem” where engineers dissect what went wrong after the fact, they tried to anticipate how people might misuse a feature — for financial gain, for example

 

Facebook, India, Fake News, Hate Speech, Russia, Sheryl Sandberg, digital
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

.Facebook isn’t saying how long it has been taking this “pre-mortem” approach, though the practice isn’t unique to the company. Nonetheless, it’s a significant step given that many of Facebook’s current problems stem from its failure to foresee how bad actors might co-opt the service.

 

Facebook also hopes the feature’s slow rollout will prevent problems.

How it works

To find out if “Today In” is available in your city or town, tap the “menu” icon with the three horizontal lines. Then scroll down until you see it. If you want, you can choose to see the local updates directly in your news feed.

For now, the company is offering this only in small and mid-sized cities such as Conroe, Texas, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Large cities such as New York or Los Angeles have added challenges, such as an abundance of news and information, and may need to be broken up into smaller neighborhoods.

 

Facebook, India, Fake News, Hate Speech, Russia, digital
A Facebook panel is seen during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, in Cannes, France. VOA

 

The posts in “Today In” are curated by artificial intelligence; there is no human involvement. The service aggregates posts from the Facebook pages for news organizations, government agencies and community groups like dog shelters. For this reason, a kid couldn’t declare a snow day, because “Today In” relies on the school’s official page. Discussion posts from local Facebook groups may also be included.

For now, the information is tailored only by geography, but this might change. A person with no kids, for example, might not want to see updates from schools.

Also Read: Social Media laws Should Be Tightened: Germany

Safeguards?

Facebook uses software filters to weed out objectionable content, just as it does on people’s regular news feed. But the filters are turned up for “Today In.” If a good friend posts something a bit objectionable, you are still likely to see it because Facebook takes your friendship into account. But “Today In” posts aren’t coming from your friends, so Facebook is more likely to keep it out. (VOA)