Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
IANS Photos

"Backable" pulls back the curtain on the elusive X-factor that some people just seem to have and offers concrete tools like crafting the right pitch and scaling the vision for a project.

Here's a groundbreaking book that boldly claims that the key to success in business is not talent but the ability to persuade people to take a bet on potential. Suneel Gupta, a visiting scholar at Harvard, contends in "Backable" (Hachette) that no one ever makes it alone and asks: What is it about certain people that makes us want to take a bet on them?

As it turns out, it's not what you think. Backability is not driven by having the best experience, the finest pedigree of the most innovative ideas. In fact, many highly successful people are backed long before they are qualified. We tend to view these people as lucky. But the decision to back them is neither an accident nor a mistake, and rarely the result of good luck.

Drawing from his own business experience, countless interviews with some of tech's biggest innovators and compelling case studies of classic success stories such as Howard Schultz and Elon Musk, Gupta breaks down the qualities of backable people. "Backable" pulls back the curtain on the elusive X-factor that some people just seem to have and offers concrete tools like crafting the right pitch and scaling the vision for a project. Anyone from aspiring entrepreneurs to start-up stars can master these skills and jumpstart their next big idea.

ALS READ: books and authors in 2020

Fast Company ranked it the number 1 most innovative company in healthcare and was named the 'New Face of Innovation' by the New York Stock Exchange. He then served as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Silicon Valley's top venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins before moving from San Francisco to his hometown in Michigan to run for US Congress.

His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, and Vanity Fair. Website: suneelgupta.com. Twitter: @suneel. Carlye Adler, who assisted with the book, is an award-winning journalist and four-time New York Times bestselling co-author-collaborator. She lives in Connecticut with her husband and two daughters. (IANS/JC)



Popular

Photo by Campaign Creators on Unsplash

Services and products, like at-home workouts, popped up all over social media from new and exciting businesses.

By- Laura

The pandemic brought about a global boom of entrepreneurship in 2020. Thousands of small businesses launched in the UK last year, and many were very successful. Some businesses started as passion projects, while others aimed to fill a hole in the pandemic market. Services and products, like at-home workouts, popped up all over social media from new and exciting businesses. The pandemic left many Brits financially unstable and scared for the future of their career. Launching their own business gave them something to focus on again and a small amount of income.

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

The brand focuses on creating quality products that are high efficacy made with all-natural and no chemicals in the formulae.

One of Indias fast growing Direct To Consumer (DTC) beauty and personal care brands, MyGlamm, launches its national TVC around the message 'All Natural #NoNasties today with actress Shraddha Kapoor, who is also an investor in the brand.

Kapoor who has a great millennial and Gen Z connect introduces 'My SUPERFOODS Kajal' which has No Parabens, No Mineral Oils, No Nasties while still being long-lasting and smudge-free and made with the goodness of nature. This is followed by many girls trying applying the kajal with confidence and while highlighting the ingredients Avocado Oil, Goji Berries, Vitamin E and Sunflower Seed Oil.

Keep Reading Show less
Pixabay

Phishing attacks targeting organisations rose up considerably during the pandemic.

Phishing attacks targeting organisations rose up considerably during the pandemic, as millions of employees working from home became a prime target for cybercriminals. A large majority (83 per cent) of IT teams in India said the number of phishing emails targeting their employees increased during 2020, according to a report by UK-based cybersecurity firm Sophos on Monday.

"It can be tempting for organisations to see phishing attacks as a relatively low-level threat, but that underestimates their power. Phishing is often the first step in a complex, multi-stage attack. According to Sophos Rapid Response, attackers frequently use phishing emails to trick users into installing malware or sharing credentials that provide access to the corporate network," Sophos' Principal Research Scientist, Chester Wisniewski said in a statement. The findings also reveal that there is a lack of common understanding about the definition of phishing. For instance, 67 per cent of IT teams in India associate phishing with emails that falsely claim to be from a legitimate organisation, and which are usually combined with a threat or request for information.

Scam Phishing Fraud The findings also reveal that there is a lack of common understanding about the definition of phishing. | Pixabay

Keep reading... Show less