Wednesday July 18, 2018

‘Tummy tuck’ reduces back pain after childbearing: Study

The study covered 214 women undergoing abdominoplasty with repair of the abdominal muscles at nine Australian plastic surgery centres

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  • Tummy tuck can reduce back pain after pregnancy
  • Many women opt for the surgery after childbearing
  • Tummy tuck is rather healthy

Besides restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty or “tummy tuck” — a surgical operation involving the removal of excess flesh from the abdomen — can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, a study says.

Epilepsy drug in pregnant women may increase oral cleft risk in baby
A tummy tuck can reduce back pain after childbearing. Wikimedia Commons

Many women seek tummy tuck surgery to restore the shape and appearance of the abdomen after childbearing, but the new study, published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, suggests that it also improves two of the most common physical complaints experienced by women after labour and delivery.

“Abdominoplasty has a proven functional benefit as well as a cosmetic benefit,” said lead author D.

Also Read: Lia, the Pregnancy Test You Can Flush

Alastair Taylor of The CAPS Clinic in Deakin, Australia. The study covered 214 women undergoing abdominoplasty with repair of the abdominal muscles at nine Australian plastic surgery centres.

The women’s average age was about 42 years, with an average of 2.5 deliveries.

Before and after surgery, the women completed questionnaires rating their disability from back pain and urinary incontinence.

Also Read: Protein responsible for postpartum depression in pregnancy found 

In the preoperative questionnaires, about 51 percent of women had moderate to severe disability from back pain, while urinary incontinence was a “significant concern” for 42.5 percent.

genetic testing
Back pain is a common problem during pregnancy and after childbirth. Pixabay

On follow-up questionnaires at six weeks and six months, scores for both problems showed major improvement, the study said. At six months, only nine percent of patients still had a moderate disability from back pain. Urinary incontinence remained a significant problem for less than two percent of women, the findings showed.

“By reducing the problems of back pain and incontinence, abdominoplasty with rectus repair leads to a better life for women after childbearing,” Taylor said. IANS

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Being Positive During Pregnancy May Lead to Kids Being in Shape: Study

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy

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The results showed that a mother's psychological background during pregnancy is a factor associated with teenage weight gain. Pixabay

Did you know even your mood and attitude during pregnancy can have an effect on the body weight of your children when they grow up? A new study has found that teenagers are less likely to be overweight if their mother or father had a positive attitude during pregnancy.

Negative attitude, or a lack of self-belief in your ability to bring in changes to your lifestyle through your actions, may be associated with unhealthy weight gain in your children during teenage years, suggests the study published in the International Journal of Obesity.

“We’ve been able to show that a lack of self-belief in a parent’s ability to influence change by healthy eating, stopping smoking or breast feeding is a contributing factor to their child being overweight by the time they are 15,” said lead study author Jean Golding, Professor at University of Bristol in Britain.

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy.

Similar answers from their children at age of eight and the child’s fat mass measurement up to the age of 17 were also analysed.

Pregnant woman
Pregnant woman. Pixabay

The results showed that a mother’s psychological background during pregnancy is a factor associated with teenage weight gain.

The study examined a personality attribute known as the Locus of Control. It is a psychological measure for an individual’s attitudes towards their lifestyle and a belief in being able to change outcomes, such as health, through their own actions.

Someone with an external Locus of Control would feel that there is little point in making an effort as what happens to them is due to luck and circumstance.

Also Read: thyroid Dysfunction May Lead to Diabetes During Pregnancy

The researchers found that teenagers at age 15 had an excess weight of actual fat to the extent of 1.7 kg if their mothers did not think their actions would make a difference and held a laissez-faire attitude.

If their fathers had this attitude the excess weight of fat was 1.49 kg and if the child later thought this way the excess was 1.5 kg, the study said.

“This is important research for health campaigners looking to change behaviours and the next steps should be looking at the differences between parents who managed to change their Locus of Control compared to those who did not change,” Golding added. (IANS)