Saturday January 19, 2019
Home World Rajan Zed cri...

Rajan Zed criticizes Turkey’s ban on sacred symbols at Yoga centers

0
//

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

Istanbul: Distinguished Hindu statesman Rajan Zed, in a statement in Nevada (USA) today criticized the banning of sacred symbols at Yoga centers by the Turkey government.

Last month, Turkey officials had banned all religious symbols and music from Yoga centers operating in the country. As a result, playing religious music or sacred chants, exhibiting sacred symbols, keeping sacred statues, or burning incenses were prohibited.

The directive to ban religious symbols was prepared by the Sports for Everyone Federation of Turkey (HİS) and was then passed by the Ministry of Youth and Sports.

Hürriyet daily had quoted Süleyman Gönülateş, the Technical Board head of HIS as saying: “At the drafting stage, the opinions of yoga trainers were sought. We mean all religions, including Islam with the phrase ‘different religions.’ When symbols belonging to religions enter sports centers, then missionary work and politics begins. If yoga is a sport, then it should have nothing in it which is related to religion. We don’t want to see explicit symbols such as crosses at sports centers.”

Criticizing this ban, Zed described it as “unnecessary obstruction and burdensome on Yoga in Turkey.”

He noted that Yoga was a mental and physical discipline by means of which the human-soul (jivatman) is united with the universal-soul (parmatman).

Urging Turkey to reconsider its decision, Zed added that Yoga was the repository of something basic in the human soul and psyche and attempts at regulating it were kind of an infringement.

 

Next Story

Trilateral Summit On Afghan Peace To Be Hosted By Turkey

The highest Pakistani court also handed over schools being run by the outlawed organization in the country to a Turkish government foundation.

0
Pakistan
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, welcomes Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan to Ankara, Turkey, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019. The two expected to discus bilateral and regional issues. VOA

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan says “a much stronger effort” is needed to further ongoing peace talks his country is facilitating between the United States and Afghanistan’s Taliban.

Addressing a televised joint news conference in Ankara after official talks with President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Khan said Afghans have suffered for decades and it is time for the International community to help bring an end to the war in the country.

“Pakistan has already been helping a dialogue between the Taliban and the Americans but it needs a much stronger effort from all the stakeholders, neighbors,” the prime minister emphasized.

Khan was referring to two-day talks in Abu Dhabi last month between U.S. special envoy for Afghanistan reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, and senior Taliban representatives that Pakistan said it had arranged.

Taliban, afghanistan, pakistan
Members of Taliban delegation take their seats during the multilateral peace talks on Afghanistan in Moscow, Nov. 9, 2018. VOA

Khalilzad and the Taliban described the dialogue “productive” and promised to meet again soon. Insurgents demand complete withdrawal of U.S. and NATO forces from Afghanistan, saying their presence are blocking progress toward peace.

Speaking Friday, President Erdoğan announced he will host a trilateral summit meeting with Pakistan and Afghanistan after Turkey’s March 31 local elections to discuss the peace process.

“I look forward to the summit meeting inshallah [God willing] in Istanbul where we hope that Afghanistan, Pakistan and Turkey will be able to help in this [Afghan] peace process … a much badly needed peace,” Prime Minister Khan said.

Pakistan’s role in arranging the U.S.-Taliban talks, analysts say, is leading to a thaw in Islamabad’s traditionally tumultuous relationship with Washington.

Speaking on Wednesday, President Donald Trump apparently acknowledged the improvement in mutual ties. “We do want to have a great relationship with Pakistan … so, I look forward to meeting with the new leadership in Pakistan. We will be doing that in the not too distant future.”

Afghan President, elections
Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks during a U.N. conference on Afghanistan, Nov. 28, 2018, at U.N. offices in Geneva, Switzerland. VOA

Khan’s two-day official meetings in Turkey ended Friday and it was his first visit to the country since taking power after the July elections in Pakistan. The two Muslim nations enjoy close relations.

Prime Minister Khan assured Turkey of his country’s support to defeat Islamic State, saying the terrorist group “already has emerged in various parts of Afghanistan” and threatens the security of Pakistan.

Erdoğan also praised a recent ruling by Pakistan’s supreme court, which declared exiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen’s organization, FETÖ, a terrorist group.

Afghanistan
U.S.-based Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen at his home in Saylorsburg, Pa., U.S. July 10, 2017. VOA

The highest Pakistani court also handed over schools being run by the outlawed organization in the country to a Turkish government foundation.

Also Read: Peace Offer By Afghan Government Gets Rejected By Taliban

Turkey accuses Gulen of orchestrating a failed coup in 2016. (VOA)